Principles of Public Health week 2 lecture notes

Principles of Public Health week 2 lecture notes -...

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Principles of Public Health: Communicable Disease Week 2 (January 31, 2012) Communicable disease part 1 Reasons to study communicable disease New emerging infections are replacing old o SARS, Avian Flu, West Nile, Monkeypox, Ebola, Hantavirus, BSE Re-emerging and drug resistant “old” diseases o TB, Anthrax, Smallpox, other agents of bioterrorism Importance of Communicable Disease Used as barometer of community’s health o Sensitive to social conditions Knowledge o Most public health information comes from studying communicable disease etiology Theories of Disease Supernatural Hippocratic Miasma (disease caused by bad air) Germ theory (small organisms responsible for making us ill) Epidemiological triangle/triad Factors that help spread communicable disease Human activities that cause ecological damage and close contact with wildfire Modern agricultural practices o Close contact with animals; soil International o Travel o Distribution of food and exotic animals Breakdown of social restraints on sexual behavior and intravenous drug use Definitions A communicable disease : is one that can be transmitted from one human to another or from animals to humans A Zoonosis: a disease or infection that is transmissible from a vertebrate animal to man o Normally a disease of animals Communicable vs. Non-communicable Diseases o Caused by specific biological agent or its product Communicable (infectious) Can be transmitted from infected to susceptible host Non-communicable (noninfectious) Cannot be transmitted from infected to susceptible host
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o Acute 3 months or less o Chronic More than 3 months Prevention o The planning for & taking of action to forestall the onset of a disease or other health problem (ex: immunization) Intervention o Taking action during an event (ex: taking an antibiotic) Control o Containment of disease; limiting transmission Eradication o Total elimination of the disease
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2012 for the course PHLT 241 taught by Professor Busniak during the Spring '12 term at Rutgers.

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Principles of Public Health week 2 lecture notes -...

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