AED-202 wk 8 assignment~ Social and moral development.

AED-202 wk 8 assignment~ Social and moral development. -...

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Running head: SOCIAL AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT 1 Social and Moral Development Anna Borsick AED/202 January 15, 2012 Kai Walker
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SOCIAL AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT 2 Social and Moral Development The social and moral development of children evolves at different levels and in different stages depending on influencing factors like gender, culture, and the child’s care-givers. The experiences a child has from early childhood through adolescence will mold the development of his or her moral and social capabilities and understandings. According to McDevitt and Ormrod (2004, p. 414) children and adolescents spend much of their mental energy engaged in social cognition, thinking about people (including themselves) and society. Social cognition is one of the most important topics in early childhood and through adolescence. The reason it is so important, it is observed in many developmental places in a child’s growth and development. A child’s social developments are either in-ward or out-ward beliefs; for instance, who they are, what they stand for, and where they hope to be in life; these are in-ward social cognition developmental beliefs. On the other hand out-ward social cognition refers to the child’s trust or lack of trust for other people based on past attachment experiences with care-givers. As early as two a child can have some implicit understanding of what other people know. They can also become more in-tune with people’s mental states at this stage in social development. Social development begins at birth and by early childhood children can spontaneously use words that refer to other’s emotions and desires. At this age a child can express a want, a feeling as well as desires and further articulate what they believe they know or think in their speech. Early childhood sets the foundation for later social developments, for instance, according to McDevitt and Ormrod (2004, p. 417) as children age they become more sophisticated in understanding intentional and unintentional behaviors. A three-year-old often thinks that people intentionally cause mistakes and accidents. Whereas a four or five-year-old understands that some behaviors are intentional and other unintentional, and can better distinguish between the
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SOCIAL AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT 3 two types of behaviors. As children reach elementary grades (middle childhood, ages six through ten) they begin to draw on more sophisticated inferences about people’s mental states. Furthermore, grasping the understanding that not everyone’s behaviors model how they accurately feel or think. Along with these developments in social cognition, a child in early childhood starts to realize that not everyone’s interpretation of a situation will be the same. What
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2012 for the course AED 202 taught by Professor Haskell during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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AED-202 wk 8 assignment~ Social and moral development. -...

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