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Lecture 20_Virtue or Sentiment

Lecture 20_Virtue or Sentiment - Virtue Morality Sentiment...

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Unformatted text preview: Virtue, Morality, Sentiment Morality as Virtue: Aristotle i. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is the best systematic guide to ancient Greek moral and ethical thinking. The significant feature of the Greek moral system is the focus on virtue. Aristotle’s conception of virtue is based on the idea that man is a rational being. Thus, for Aristotle, virtue is a rational activity: activity in accordance with a rational principle. ii. Aristotle takes the idea that every act is for the sake of something else. But because there can be no infinite regress, there must be an end. What is the natural end that is the natural good for man? Aristotle claims that it is happiness. Happiness is what men desire for its own sake and is the natural good for man. Happiness, for Aristotle, is living according to rationality, the exercise of our most vital faculties. iii. Aristotle’s argument is based on what is “natural” to man. The good for man is that which is “natural” to him. Aristotle by “natural” means that man has certain traits that are unique to man. “natural” to him....
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Lecture 20_Virtue or Sentiment - Virtue Morality Sentiment...

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