Lecture 13_Hume - David Hume D The Congenial Skeptic David...

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David Hume D. The Congenial Skeptic: David Hume i. Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature argues that every justifiable belief must be either a relation of ideas, ” for example a statement of mathematics or logic, or a “ matter of fact ” that can be confirmed by appeal to our experience. Hume insists that all knowledge begins with basic units of sensory experience. ii. According to Hume, simple ideas are derived from simple impressions. Complex ideas are arrangements of simple ideas. To justify a belief as knowledge, then, we must break the complex ideas into simple ideas and then find the impressions upon which those ideas are based. Most metaphysical ideas cannot be defended by either of the methods that Hume proposes (showing that it is a relation of ideas or a matter of fact). iii. Hume points out three unjustified beliefs that we hold: 1. The idea of causation . From causation, we derive the principle of universal causation , which states that every event has its cause (or causes). We make
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2012 for the course PHI 2010 taught by Professor Tacks during the Spring '12 term at Florida State College.

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Lecture 13_Hume - David Hume D The Congenial Skeptic David...

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