POL 2 - Interest Groups and Their Powers and the Humans...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Interest Groups and Their Powers and the Humans Behind Them Interest Groups and Their Powers and the Humans Behind Them Mark Dee University of Texas at San Antonio 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Interest Groups and Their Powers and the Humans Behind Them Interest groups can hold enormous amounts of political sway, and whether or not these groups are beneficial is a hotly debated topic within the United States of America. There are arguments for these interest groups, that they are protecting certain vulnerable parties; there are arguments against these interest groups, that they really prey on ignorance, and that they hold too much institutional power, lobbying for negative or self-interested individuals. Interest groups, for the most part, are backed by money, and “ where flows the power, there flows the money” (Herrnson, Shaiko & Wilcox, 1998, p. 80). Money is an often talked about topic when discussing interest groups, primarily because if a lack of funding occurs, the group can flop, like anything else that requires financial support. “Interest groups spend about $2 billion lobbying the federal government every year and about $500 million every election cycle in campaign contributions” (Leech, Baumgartner, Berry, Hojnaki & Kimball, 2007, p. 5). These numbers are quite large, and show that interest groups can have considerable sway in the arena of politics. However, the reverse is also true: interest groups, with their money and financial backing, can often have little to no effect (Leech,
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 5

POL 2 - Interest Groups and Their Powers and the Humans...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online