lab2 - Mark Dee Professor David J. Young Lab 2 Date:...

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Mark Dee Professor David J. Young Lab 2 Date: January 31 2011 1) There are reverse faults, and normal faults, each associated with the Earth’s relative size at that moment in time. The Earth’s crust can be viewed as an “eggshell”. 2) a) The crust should lengthen. b) It should shorten. c) Without shortening or lengthening, the crust instead should fracture or break because of the pressure. 3) a) 30% b) 36% c) 34% 4) As of right now, the Earth doesn’t seem to be changing as much as it used to. It is relatively stable, as the different forces “cancel” each other out. New rock is “created” and then pushed back into the mantle of the Earth where the process can begin again. 6) a) Our Earth is like a lava lamp in the sense that underneath our crust is a constantly circulating mantle. This convection current allows for magma to fall, then rise back up and then fall back down again. Lava lamp behavior is the same, with chunky pieces rising, falling, then rising again. b) Our Earth is not like a lava lamp, in the sense that it is only analogous. The current itself is fueled by a
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2012 for the course GEO 1111 taught by Professor Davidj.young during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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lab2 - Mark Dee Professor David J. Young Lab 2 Date:...

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