11 - First he may want to want you despite a univocal...

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Nina Madison 4/2/12 Reading Response #11 “I want to want you, baby”. Does it follow that he or she wants you? What would Frankfurt say? I think that this follows that he or she wants you because I think that humans can “want” to want something in this sense. Frankfurt however believes that people (males) can actually feel the desire to want something rather than just simply want something. He calls this “second-order desires” where rather than first order desires where a person simply wants to do something or not want to do something, it is making a decision based on earlier thinking. Frankfurt refers to the word “want” specifically and argues that one can want to want something in situations which would follow that he or she wants you in this case. Frankfurt would say that it is possible that he or she wants you, but this answer is simple and there are many complications and situations that deal with whether this follows that he or she wants you.
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Unformatted text preview: First he may want to want you despite a univocal desire, altogether free of conflict and ambivalence, to refrain from. Someone could want someone but they might univocally want to not want that desire to be satisfied. Someone could want something, but do not want their desire to be effective. He explains this when he describes how a physician helping addicts wants to know the desire that the his patients feel for wanting a drug. The physician truly want to feel what they are going through, not the actual addiction of the drug. Additionally, Frankfurt describes how the second order can be either someone wanting something simply or someone wanting a certain desire to be his will. This is violating the second order, and only a nonhuman would be able to have a second order desire without the violation. Humans care about their free will. Frankfurt shows the complications with free will and he seems to stand relatively neutral on the subject....
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2012 for the course PHIL 262 taught by Professor Scottpaterson during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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11 - First he may want to want you despite a univocal...

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