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Study guide - 19:10 Unlikeinforming,,reinforcing,orchangingpeoples beliefsoractions

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19:10 Differences between informative and persuasive: Unlike informing, persuading is the process of creating, reinforcing, or changing people’s  beliefs or actions. Why speaking to persuade is challenging: objective is more ambitious audience analysis and adaption become much more demanding could be speaking about extremely controversial topics. Mental Dialogue: Anticipate possible objections the audience will make and answer them. Questions of fact, value, policy: Fact: question about the truth or falsity of an assertion Policy: question about whether a specific course of action should or should not be taken Four basic methods of reasoning: Reasoning from specific instances-  reasoning that moves particular facts to a general  conclusion Avoid generalizing to hastily Wording
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Reinforce arguments with statistics of testimony Reasoning from principle - reasoning that moves from a general principle to a specific  conclusion General principle: support Support minor premise Causal reasoning - reasoning that seeks to establish the relationship between cause  and effect Avoid fallacy or false cause Avoid assuming that events have only one cause. Analogical reasoning - reasoning in which a speaker compares two similar cases and  infers that what is true for the first case is also true for the second Make sure the causes being compared are alike 8 major logical fallacies: Hasty generalizations Speaker jumps to conclusion based on insufficient evidence False cause: Because one event follows another, the first event is the cause of the second Invalid analogy: An analogy in which the who cases being compared are not essentially alike Red herring: A fallacy that introduces an irrelevant issue to diver with the real issue in dispute Ad hominem  a fallacy that attacks the person rather than dealing with the real issue in dispute
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Either-or A fallacy that forces listeners to choose between two alternatives when more than two  alternatives exist. Bandwagon A fallacy that assumes that because something is popular it is therefore food, correct or  desirable Slippery slope A fallacy that assumes that taking a first step will lead to subsequent steps that cannot  be prevented. Four reasons listeners are persuaded by speakers:
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2012 for the course COMM 100 taught by Professor Nicholasschmuhl during the Fall '10 term at Wisconsin.

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Study guide - 19:10 Unlikeinforming,,reinforcing,orchangingpeoples beliefsoractions

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