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Running head: CRITIQUE OF HUMAN CARING 1 Nursing Theory Critique: Human Caring April Combs South University – Online NSG5002 September 16, 2020
CRITIQUE OF HUMAN CARING 2 Critique of Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring The purpose of this paper is to critique Jean Watson’s Human Caring Theory. The contents will discuss Watson’s background and basis for the grand theory. Lastly the paper will explain why this theory is most appropriate for my present clinical practice. Jean Watson made the point that human beings are valued and deserve to be respected, cared for, understood, nurtured, and assisted. Overall, the human is viewed as greater than, and different from, the sum of his or her parts (Nursing Theory, 2016) Background Theories are the support of nursing practice and are significant to education and scientific research by helping to determine what is already known, and what knowledge is still needed. Understanding theories helps a nurse to understand their purpose and role. Knowing a theorist’s personal and professional background, as well as the reason behind why a theorist came up with their theory, only makes the utilization of that theory more successful. Jean Watson’s Background Born in the Appalachian Mountains of West Virginia in the 1940s as the youngest of eight was Margaret Jean Hartman, later to become Dr. Jean Watson. She completed her high school diploma in West Virginia, going on to graduate from Lewis-Gale School of Nursing in Roanoke, Virginia in 1961. She got married to her husband, Douglas, that same year and went on to have two daughters and a total of five grandchildren (Jesse, 2010). Jean advanced her education in nursing at the University of Colorado in Boulder where she earned her BSN degree in 1964. She then moved on to obtain her Master’s degree in psychiatric-mental health in 1966. She then earned her doctorate in educational psychology and
CRITIQUE OF HUMAN CARING 3 counseling in 1973. She joined the staff at the University Health Sciences Center and served as Dean of Nursing, was the President of the National League for Nursing, and is also a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She is now a retired distinguished Professor Emerita and Dean Emerita of the University of Colorado Denver - College of Nursing, Anschutz Medical Center. She has received fifteen honorary Doctorates, was inducted as a Living Legend by the American Academy of Nursing in 2013, and in 2008 she founded Watson Caring Science Institute (Watson, 2020). She spent her career focusing on the human caring phenomenon. In her personal biography, she describes that even though she had written numerous books and articles on the theory, science, and philosophy of human caring, she wouldn’t truly understand it until she experienced it on her own personal level. She experienced a distressing eye injury followed by the suicide of her own husband, which truly opened her up to her own writing. She explains that she already earned the academic and theory foundation but then also acquired the wisdom through her own personal experiences of caring (Watson, 2020). She has written and co-authored

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