RevisedCh16Notes - Chapter16: TheUnionWageImpact:'swage ofunionbehaviour

RevisedCh16Notes - Chapter16: TheUnionWageImpact:'swage...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 11 pages.

Chapter 16: Union Impact on Wage and Nonwage Outcomes The Union Wage Impact: What is the average effect of unionization on a worker's wage? the impact of unions on wages has received more attention from economists than any other aspect  of union behaviour  most of the empirical research has been directed at measuring the union-nonunion wage  differential, the (percentage) difference in wages between union and otherwise comparable  nonunion workers  the first problem that one confronts is that the average wage of nonunion members may not be the  same as the average wage that would prevail in the complete absence of unions from the labour  market  unions affect not only the wages of union members but also the wages of others and a general  equilibrium model must be used to analyze the union-nonunion wage differential  o in our analysis of union wage and employment determination in the previous chapter, we  assumed that the union wage alternative (the nonunion wage) was exogenously given Figure 16.1a illustrates the effect of unions on wages and employment in a two-sector labour  market  1
Image of page 1
o the two sectors A and B can be thought of as two different industries employing the same  type of labour, which is assumed to be homogeneous  o competition in the labour market will equalize the wage rate at W o  in both sectors now assume that a union organizes the workers in sector A and is able to raise the wage rate to  W u ; assuming that the firm determines employment according to the demand for labour curve,  employment in sector A declines from E o  to E 1   o by raising the wage rate from W o  to W u , (E o  – E 1 ) former employees in sector A lose their  jobs and must find work in sector B 2
Image of page 2
in the non-union sector B, the (E o  – E 1 ) displaced workers from sector A shift the labour supply  curve to the right (from S B  to S' B ) and the excess supply of labour in sector B bids the wage rate  down from W o  to W N  in Figure 16.1a  o the new equilibrium employment level in sector B increases from E o  to E 1 ; but given an  upward-sloping labour supply curve, not all of the displaced workers from sector A are  employed in sector B (some displaced workers drop out of the labour force because the  new equilibrium wage W N  in sector B is below their reservation wage) unionization has created an equilibrium wage differential of W u  – W N  between union and nonunion  workers; this union-nonunion wage differential (W u  – W N ) is larger than the difference between the  union wage W u  and the competitive wage W o
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Spring '12
  • IB
  • Economics, Nonunion, union­nonunion wage

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes