Feb. 12 Notes - Women & Children in Poverty Tuesday...

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Tuesday February 12, 2008 Lareau (2003)
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Tuesday February 12, 2008 Albeda & Tilly (1997)
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Women’s economic well-being related to men’s Now have more access to jobs, education, and public office However, only make ~70% of what men make (1995)
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Full-time Workers, 2003-2005 (Source: American Association of University Women) Illinois US % of women w/four year college degree 31% 27% Median earnings $45,200 $45,684 Gap between 74% 74%
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Economic Opportunities Restricted due to Gender Most women responsible for Finding or providing child care Doing most of the domestic chores Educated - “glass ceiling” Limited skills or support - “bottomless pit” of poverty Four economic trends affecting women and men
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Changing Context: Four Trends (1995) Trend 1: Declining Marriage Rate 45% of women not currently married Census data cannot tell us if cohabitating Why is this important? 50% of all women over 16 years of age are taking care of children under 18 yrs of age
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Four Trends (1995) cont. Trend 2: The Growing Labor Market In 1947, women 38% as likely as men to be working or looking for work. By 1996, the number increased to 76% (+38%). These numbers are higher for black women. In 1954, they were 54% as likely to be working or looking for work. By 1996, the number was 88% (+34%). Women receive less pay per hour Women work less hours – why?
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Four Trends (1995) cont. Trend 3: Decline of Manufacturing Work In 1955, 33% of all jobs were in manufacturing. By 1955, it was just 17% of jobs. 85% of these jobs, on average, pay higher than service or retail jobs Service jobs, lower pay 1955 (24% of jobs), 1995 (50% of jobs) Reason for restructuring economy: technology, international competition, corporations maximizing profits Men making less and unable to support family, so women went into jobs out of financial necessity and for independence
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Four Trends (1995) cont. Trend 4: Poverty Trap
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SOCIOLOGY 373 taught by Professor Mendinhall during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Feb. 12 Notes - Women & Children in Poverty Tuesday...

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