CDPGUIDE.pdf - 1 INTRODUCTION General Planning and Development Model In an ideal scenario a particular local government unit(LGU manages its own growth

CDPGUIDE.pdf - 1 INTRODUCTION General Planning and...

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INTRODUCTION 1 INTRODUCTION General Planning and Development Model In an ideal scenario, a particular local government unit (LGU) manages its own growth and change through a body of plans with varying scope and time frame. The term “ideal”, however, does not imply a utopian, unrealistic or unattainable dream. It simply means a scenario that does not exist as yet. Nevertheless, it is the scenario that the Local Government Code (LGC) of 1991 (RA 7160) wants every LGU to achieve. With the aid of various plans, LGUs are expected to more effectively manage their own local development. Section 20 of the LGC mandates LGUs to prepare a comprehensive land use plan (CLUP) enacted through a zoning ordinance, while Sections 106 and 109 of the same Code mandate the LGUs to prepare comprehensive multi-sectoral development plans (CDP) and public investment programs. It is clear from the above-cited provisions of the Code that LGUs are required to prepare two plans: the CLUP and the CDP. These plans influence public and private sector investments which have the cumulative effects of making available goods and services whose quality has been improved, and making them more accessible to the people, thereby raising the level of their well-being. Any change in the level of welfare of the population, on one hand is expected to create corresponding changes in the character and configuration of the land and other physical resources of the locality. On the other hand, it may be noted that any improvement in the level of social and economic well-being of the local population will almost always entail deterioration in the quality or quantity of the physical environment. How to achieve development objectives without necessarily sacrificing the environment poses a major challenge to local development planning and management. As the LGU gains longer experience in managing its own growth and change, especially when the Sanggunian is ever alert for possibilities to formulate regulatory policies and to further support the implementation of plans, programs and projects with needed development regulations, its institutional capacity will be enhanced considerably. (See Figure 1 - A Local Planning and Development Model) The Relationship between the Comprehensive Development Plan (CDP) and the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) and the CDP are distinct and separate. The term “comprehensive” in the CLUP is understood in its geographical, territorial sense, while the term “comprehensive” in the CDP has to be understood in the sense of “multi-sectoral” development. On one hand, the CLUP can well be regarded as the plan for the long-term management of the local territory. As the skeletal-circulatory framework of the territory’s physical development, it identifies areas where development can and cannot be located and directs public and private investments accordingly. The CDP, on the other hand, is the action plan utilized by every local administration to develop and implement the proper sectoral and
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