Badminton.pdf - \u201cBadminton is like ballet dancing it requires a lot of control strength mind play and measured movement.\u201d \u2013Aamir Khan Having a

Badminton.pdf - u201cBadminton is like ballet dancing it...

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“Badminton is like ballet dancing, it requires a lot of control, strength, mind play and measured movement.” –Aamir Khan Having a good physical condition alone is not enough to completely achieve physical fitness. You should also use the power of your mind to concentrate on what you are doing. Badminton is one of the best sports in order to attain the perfect condition of your body and mind. Let’s have fun!
Lesson 2: Badminton “The objective of the game is simple, that is to hit the shuttle over the net so that it lands in your opponent’s court before it can be returned. You can hit the shuttles fast, slow, high, flat or low. You can smash it with maximum power or use the most delicate to touch shots.” Before we begin this lesson, let’s have a warm- up activity. HISTORY OF BADMINTON Badminton evolved from a similar game called battledore played in fifth-century B.C. China. The people in China then played a game called ti jian zi. A direct translation from this word ‘ti jian ki’ is kicking the shuttle. As the name suggests, the objective of the game is to keep the shuttle from hitting the group without using hand. Whether this sport has anything to do with the history of Badminton is up fpr debate. It was, however the first game that used a Shuttle. About five centuries later, a game named battledore and shuttlecock was played in China, Japan, India, and Greece. This is a game where you use the battledore (a paddle) to hit the shuttlecock back and forth. By the 16 th century, it has become a popular game among children in England. In Europe this game was known as jeu de Volant to them. In the 1860s, a game named poona was played in India. This game is much like the Battledore and Shuttlecock but with an added net. The British army learned this game in India and took the equipment back to England during the 1870s. The game we all know as badminton began in the 19th century (1870) and was named by the Duke of Beaufort after the Badminton House in Gloucestershire. In England, there had long been a children’s game known as “battlecore and shuttlecock”. Player used a paddle, called a battledore, to keep a cork staffed with feathers called a shuttlecock, in the air for as ‘long as possible’. This game had been popular since medieval period times. The modern version had migrated somehow to India and then back again. England played the same badminton rules as India in 1887. The Bath Badminton Club standardized the rules and regulations, making the game more inclined towards the England ideas of how the game should be played. The Badminton Association of England published the first set of rules in line with the new regulations in 1893 and officially launched the game of badminton. The All England Open Badminton Championships began in 1899 and were the world’s first badminton competition. In 1934 the International Badminton Federation (IBF), which is now known as Badminton World Federation, was established. England, France, Canada, Denmark, Netherlands,
New Zealand, Ireland, Scotland and Wales were the first members. In 1936 India joined as an affiliate. Globally, the Badminton World Federation (BWF) governs and promotes the sport.

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