The_School-Wide_Cultural_Compe.pdf - Judith A. Nelson,...

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This study was designed to assess the (score) construct-related validity of an instrument called the School-Wide Cultural Competence Observation Checklist(SCCOC). The instrument was developed to use as atool in conducting culture audits as a means of assess-ing school-wide cultural competence, or how well aschool’s programs, policies, and practices reflect theperspectives and experiences of diverse groups. Anexploratory factor analysis was used to identify the fac-tor structure of the SCCOC. Results revealed that theSCCOC contained two factors that explained 72.1%of the total variance. These factors, called Policy (22items) and Practice (11 items), yielded score reliabili-ty coefficients of .97 and .89, respectively. Recommen-dations for incorporating a school-wide cultural com-petence assessment as part of a school counseling pro-gram are then discussed.Recent literature suggests that professional schoolcounselors must redefine their roles as advocatesfor all students and leaders in the educationalreform movement (American School CounselorAssociation, 2005a; Bemak, 2000; Bemak &Chung, 2005; House & Sears, 2002; Martin,2002). Ensuring that all students have access to aquality education is a responsibility for which schoolcounselors are ideally positioned. Advocacy is thekey to removing barriers, creating opportunities,and working toward social justice for all students,regardless of race, color, ethnicity, or socioeconom-ic status (Bemak & Chung). Professional schoolcounselors are poised to impact the quality of edu-cation for all students, and the new vision of coun-selors as leaders provides a good fit for the multicul-tural competence movement.The new vision of the school counseling profes-sion includes the following skills: (a) focusing onimproving student achievement; collaborating withstudents, staff, and parents; (b) using advocacy skillsto challenge social inequities; (c) using data to advo-cate for minority and impoverished students; (d)becoming an expert in organizational change; (e)becoming a competent user of technology; (f) usingcounselor competencies such as group facilitationskills to seek systemic change; and (g) developingthe competencies to operate in a diverse community(Martin, 2002, p. 152). These skills go beyond indi-vidual cultural competence to a more global per-spective in which school counselors are instrumentalin creating “culturally competent” schools.CULTURAL COMPETENCE FOR SCHOOLCOUNSELORSCulturally competent educational organizationsvalue diversity in both theory and practice and maketeaching and learning relevant and meaningful tostudents of various cultures (Klotz, 2006). Culturalcompetence in the school counseling literature hasprimarily focused on how to be effective when coun-seling culturally and ethnically diverse students(Council for the Accreditation of Counseling andRelated Educational Programs, 2001; Holcomb-McCoy, 2004; Lewis & Hayes, 1991; Sue, Arre-dondo, & McDavis, 1992). Holcomb-McCoy iden-tified nine categories of cultural competence forschool counselors: (a) multicultural counseling, (b)

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Term
Fall
Professor
Tamika Hibbert
Tags
Multiculturalism, School counselor, Professional School Counseling, ASCA

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