American Revolution - Slavery

American Revolution - Slavery - Johnson 1 Peter Johnson...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Johnson 1 Peter Johnson Tues Thurs 12:45 Dr. Salvucci Final Paper A Colored Look on Equality Pledged: Peter Johnson During the American Revolution, leaders of the Patriot cause repeatedly  argued that British policy would make the colonists slaves to the British.  The  colonists’ emphasis on this point was quite hypocritical, seeing as the ownership  of slaves was quite commonplace among them.  A figurehead of the Colonialist  movement, Thomas Jefferson, wrote, “All men are created equal, that they are  endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are  Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.”; yet he himself was the owner of  slaves.   Although the initial motives for freedom from British rule were  contradictory to the Patriots' own habits, as a result of the American Revolution, a  large amount of slaves were manumitted, and thousands of others ran away.  Slaves felt no allegiance to either side, and therefore fought for the side that was 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Johnson 2 believed to give them the best chance of being set free.   As many slaves were  manumitted, ran away, or perished in the war, by the close of the Revolutionary  War, slavery was at an all-time low.  This would not remain the case however.  With the invention of the cotton gin in the late 1790’s, the South became  completely reliant upon slaves for their agriculturally-based economy. As slaves  were an incredibly cheap source of labor they only became more and more  prevalent. By 1810, Southern states had three times the amount of slaves as in  1770.  This was completely contradictory to the practices in the North, where  states were freeing slaves as a result of state court decisions or the enactment of  gradual emancipation schemes.  The populace during the American Revolution  had many divergent viewpoints concerning slavery.  The question that derives  from this is how could a nation that was built for the free man have such a crisis  to solve regarding slavery? The arguments written by Benjamin Rush and  Richard Nisbet, which are formed on a religious basis, represent public opinions  which would later crystallize and result in armed conflict.  Benjamin Rush, a prominent physician and a founding father of the United  States, was vehemently against slavery.  In 1773, he wrote  An Address to the  Inhabitants of the British Colonies in America, Upon Slave-Keeping .  In this 
Background image of page 2
Johnson 3 article his main point against slavery is that it is not supported by scripture.  He  also emphasizes the lack of morality of the plantation owners and attempts to  display them as dark and sinister people.  In response, a West-Indies planter by 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 301 taught by Professor Salvucci during the Spring '08 term at Trinity U.

Page1 / 10

American Revolution - Slavery - Johnson 1 Peter Johnson...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online