Introduction, Significance of Brown v. The Board of Education - Introduction The Significance of Brown v The Board of Education Topeka Kansas The

Introduction, Significance of Brown v. The Board of Education

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Introduction: The Significance of Brown v. The Board of Education, Topeka, KansasThe Supreme Court decision in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka, Kansashas been credited with much significance. For some, it signaled the start of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, while for others, it represented the fall of segregation. Even in the footnotes of the decision, however, the Court raised questions as to how much authority it had and how to proceed toward getting compliance. In the brief summary of events that follows, I have drawn primarily from Klugers study, Simple Justice.The Brown decision was a landmark because it overturned the legal policies established by the Plessy v. Fergusondecision that legalized the practices of separate but equal. In the Plessy decision, the 14th Amendment was interpreted in such a way that e quality in the law could be met through segregated facilities. Jim Crow laws were passed throughout the South and they established separate facilities for Blacks and Whites in everything from schools to restrooms, drinking fountains to witness stands in courtrooms.For many years, the Civil Rights movement during the first 50 years of the 20th Century accepted this policy of separate but equal in its struggle for access into the society. It fought in many communities for equal pay for teachers and for equal school facilities. It fought for equal libraries, recreational facilities, and health services. Plessy defined the terms of the struggle.

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