Unit 3 Review Guide.docx - Name Due Date College Board...

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Name Due Date College Board Concept Outline Period 3: 1754 to 1800 Key Concept 3.1: British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and the Revolutionary War. I. The competition among the British, French, and American Indians for economic and political advantage in North America culminated in the Seven years’ War (the French and Indian War), in which Britain defeated France and allied American Indians. A. Colonial rivalry intensified between Britain and France in the mid-18 th century, as the growing population of the British colonies expanded into the interior of North America, threatening French–Indian trade networks and American Indian autonomy. Examples: French-Huron alliance, British-Iroquois alliance, French and Indian War, Albany Plan of Union, Treaty of Paris Example: Name It, Cite It Define it: What is it? Who are they? Historical Significance: Why does it matter? How does this example prove the statements above to be true? B. Britain achieved a major expansion of its territorial holdings by defeating the French, but at tremendous expense, setting the stage for imperial efforts to raise revenue and consolidate control over the colonies. Examples: End of salutary neglect, writs of assistance, use of admiralty courts to try smugglers, virtual representation of Parliament Example: Name It, Cite It Define it: What is it? Who are they? Historical Significance: Why does it matter? How does this example prove the statements above to be true? 1
C. After the British victory, imperial officials’ attempts to prevent colonists from moving westward generated colonial opposition, while native groups sought to both continue trading with Europeans and resist the encroachments of colonists on tribal lands. Examples: Pontiac’s War, Proclamation of 1763, Iroquois Confederacy, Chief Little Turtle and the Western Confederacy (1793-1795) Example: Name It, Cite It Define it: What is it? Who are they? Historical Significance: Why does it matter? How does this example prove the statements above to be true? II. The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain A. The imperial struggles of the mid-18th century, as well as new British efforts to collect taxes without direct colonial representation or consent and to assert imperial authority in the colonies, began to unite the colonists against perceived and real constraints on their economic activities and political rights. Examples: Sugar Act (1764), Stamp Act (1765), Quartering Act (1765), Declaratory Act (1766), Townshend Acts (1767), Tea Act (1773), Intolerable Acts (1774), Quebec Act (1774) Example: Name It, Cite It Define it: What is it? Who are they? Historical Significance: Why does it matter? How does this example prove the statements above to be true? 2
B. Colonial leaders based their calls for resistance to Britain on arguments about the rights of British subjects, the rights of the individual, local traditions of self-rule, and the ideas of the Enlightenment. Examples: Taxation without representation, consent of the governed, republicanism, bicameral colonial legislatures, natural rights Example: Name It, Cite It Define it: What is it? Who are they? Historical Significance: Why does it matter? How does this example prove the statements above to be true? C. The effort for American independence was energized by colonial leaders such as Benjamin Franklin , as well as by popular movements that included the political activism of laborers, artisans, and women.

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