One way to think of these rules is the following what

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Unformatted text preview: his form. Also, the variable may or may not be an x so don’t get too locked into always seeing an x there. To solve linear equations we will make heavy use of the following facts. 1. If a = b then a + c = b + c for any c. All this is saying is that we can add a number, c, to both sides of the equation and not change the equation. 2. If a = b then a - c = b - c for any c. As with the last property we can subtract a number, c, from both sides of an equation. 3. If a = b then ac = bc for any c. Like addition and subtraction we can multiply both sides of an equation by a number, c, without changing the equation. 4. If a = b then ab = for any non-zero c. We can divide both sides of an equation by a cc non-zero number, c, without changing the equation. These facts form the basis of almost all the solving techniques that we’ll be looking at in this chapter so it’s very important that you know them and don’t forget about them. One way to think of these rules is the following. What we do to one side of an equation we have to do to the other side of the equat...
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2012 for the course ICT 4 taught by Professor Mrvinh during the Spring '12 term at Hanoi University of Technology.

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