SOC 655 Debate #1 - Sam Dixon Debate Notes#1 Do sports build character Affirmative The Great American Football Ritual(Douglas Foley 1990 Description

SOC 655 Debate #1 - Sam Dixon Debate Notes#1 Do sports...

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Sam DixonDebate Notes #1Do sports build character?
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Unformatted text preview: training for their craft. Also, Coakley explains that by having adult involvement, the children are able to specialize in particular sports so that they are able to play and excel in a particular activity. The Great American Football Ritual (Douglas Foley, 1990) Description: Ethnographic study of the football season of the small south Texas town and all of the cultural practices that go along with it. In the subtitled part of the article called “The Spectators: Male Socialization Through Ex-players,” Foley explains that so many of the adult male figures in the community take the time to reach out to the current players to guide them in their play. The author explains that these former players who are now essentially pillars of the community look out for the younger players by giving them “tips” to improve their game as well as critique the games each week. This involvement would seemingly be positive since it is done in an informal setting and is only with the hope of helping and being a part of the players’ sports lives. In class discussion/lecture (Knoester, 2012) Description: In the lecture regarding children and sports, some major points about the effect that adult involvement has on youth sports was discussed. In discussion/lecture, it was discussed that without adults there essentially would be no organized sports for children because they obviously cannot run complex sports programs themselves. This also corresponds to the lecture in which we discussed if sports have a positive effect on the development of children. The two concepts correlate to each other in that without the adult involvement there would be no childhood-organized sports, which could in turn hinder some developmental aspects for the youth. This means that adult involvement in youth sports is not only a good thing for children but in some way essential for the betterment of children. Student Council, Volunteering, Basketball or Marching Band: Which extracurricular involvement matters? (Jacquelynne Eccles &Bonnie Barber, 1999) Description: Examined a sample of 1259 mostly white American adolescents that engage in one or more of the specified five types of activities and studied the link between these and education as well as involvement in risky behavior. This study conducted for the analysis of this article found that the youths that played organized sports (in high school) actually did better in school than those who did not participate in activities. This again can be attributed in some way to adult involvement because without this there would be no organized sports. The adults act as coaches, fans, and administrators for these sports that directly affect the scholastic performance of the youth. Without the participation of the adults, there would not be organized sports within the school and the grades of those who have chosen to participate may actually suffer and possibly lead to more crime or lower college attendance rates. Storming the Castle: Why We Need to Know Our Radical Sports History (Zirin, 2005) Description: This article goes into explanation and analysis of some of the greatest political motions by athletes throughout history. It looks to explain through personal observation the connection between sports and the political/societal world. While this article does not directly pertain to youth and adult involvement within sports, it does talk about the adults of the professional world that the youth spend their entire lives looking up to for whatever sport it is they choose. These bold political statements for Civil Rights, Poverty, the Vietnam War are all going to have an effect on how children view these same issues because their “sports idol or icon” so openly feels this way. This can be helpful in connecting children with something they love and the realities of the world throughout history. Negative Bigger, Stronger, Faster (film) Description: The movie is about the deviant nature of a family and friends that took a strong liking for power lifting and wrestling. The film takes an in depth look at the use of performance enhancing drugs in the athletic world and whether or not this is an acceptable way of being the best. The film dedicated a portion of its time to the one brother of the narrator who was now acting as a football coach for a high school varsity while still actively taking steroids. The brother explains that while he did not announce to his players as a group that he was currently using, he said he would feel the need to be honest with them about it if they approached him personally. This type of adult being involved in sports especially when so many of the players expressed the respect they have for their coach is definitely not a good thing. This openness regarding his use of performance enhancing drugs that are illegal may influence these young players to think that such action is okay or that they should also start using such a substance. Gender and Society: Separating the Men from the Moms- The Making of Adult Gender Segregation in Youth Sports (Michael A. Messner & Suzel Bozada-Deas, 2009) Description: Over a period of multiple years, there is the use of participant observation as well as interviews of the gender dynamics that ensue within the adults (including volunteers and parents) and the jobs that are acceptable for men and women to do. This type of adult involvement in youth sports may also be a negative one because of the stereotypical and unequal gender roles that are enforced by having mostly men be coaches and mostly only women being the supporting team moms. The society that we live in today tries to enforce equality among men and women but this type of assignment of the volunteer jobs makes it seem to children that only men should be in positions of leadership and power while women do all of the background work. This way of going about things reinforces to children that your knowledge or skill will not get you positions of leadership but rather your sex will ultimately be the deciding factor. Also, this teaches the adolescent girls that striving for power or leadership is not common or worth their time because those are the jobs that are typical of men, which should not be the example set for any young person. Youth Sports Programs Need Unbiased Adults (Doulas Abrams, 2003. Christian Science Monitor Vol. 95, Issue 183 p. 11) Description: The articles uses a personal observation to explain and analyze the biases that go on in youth sports due to parents sitting in positions of power of the organized sport. The author explains a hockey tryout in which the beginning of the tryout the coaches pinned numbers to the different boys trying out. At the end of the week, the boys that had been wearing #1-17 since the first days were on the first team and those wearing #18-34 were now apart of the second team. He furthers his explanation stating that those boys on the first team could not all necessarily be the best players since their destiny had been determined since day one. However, they all did happen to be the sons and friends of those parents who sat on the board of directors for the organized hockey league. This type of bias and use of power is anything but beneficial for youth in any sport because it simply reinforces “its not what you do, but who you know” at such a young age that discouragement from participation unless you are of the elite will likely ensue....
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  • Winter '12
  • ChrisKnoester
  • Sociology, Coakley, Aggressive High School Sports

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