Exurban-Impacts_Wildlife-Plants-2007-USDA-NRCS

Exurban-Impacts_Wildlife-Plants-2007-USDA-NRCS - May 2007...

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Unformatted text preview: May 2007 Effects of Exurban Development on Wildlife and Plant Communities Technical Note No. 75 Agricultural Wildlife Conservation Center Issued May 2007 The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, re- prisal, or because all or a part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should con- tact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720–2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20250–9410, or call (800) 795–3272 (voice) or (202) 720–6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Information in this publication was compiled by Jeremy D. Maestas , wildlife biologist, Natural Resources Conservation Service. Special thanks to R. Knight , E. Odell , B. Lenth , and W. Gilgert for providing helpful comments and peer review for this publication. Suggested citation: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. 2007. Effects of Exurban Development on Wildlife and Plant Communities, by Jeremy D. Maestas. Technical Note No. _____, Washington, DC. Technical Note No. 75, May 2007 Effects of Exurban Development on Wildlife and Plant Communities Introduction Exurban developments are low-density residential de- velopments that occur beyond incorporated city limits. Houses in these developments are typically situated on lots from 10 to 40 acres in size, but some exurban developments have higher housing densities. Since 1950, the amount of land in this type of development has increased fivefold in the United States (Brown et al. 2005). In fact, exurban development now occupies about 25 percent of private land in the lower 48 states and is currently the fastest growing form of land use (Brown et al. 2005; Heimlich and Anderson 2001). Con- sequently, many lands that once were agricultural or natural areas are being converted to residential settle- ments (fig. 1). The location of exurban developments on the land- scape also is not random. They occur on private lands, which are often the most productive, well-watered, and hospitable places on the landscape (Scott et al. 2001). Furthermore, scenic private lands adjacent to national parks, national forests, wetlands, and streams often are preferred for development for their amenity values....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course LAR 322 taught by Professor Skabelund during the Spring '08 term at Kansas State University.

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Exurban-Impacts_Wildlife-Plants-2007-USDA-NRCS - May 2007...

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