BEM 4351 Unit VIII Essay.docx - 1 Unit VIII Essay Shawn M...

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Unit VIII Essay Shawn M. Flanagan Columbia Southern University BEM 4351, Environmental Technology Prof. George Gough 09/15/2020 1
Between 1995 and 2014 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) utilized the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to verify innovative environmental technologies that could be used to monitor, prevent, control, and clean up pollution (Ashley et al., 2005). This was a public and private partnership, which allowed regulators and others to make decisions based off the verification for the adoption of new technologies. One of these technologies is environmental monitoring, which makes up for about half of all technologies tested in the ETV Program. At the time of the article, the program was working on the verification process for ammonia continuous emission monitors (CEMs), as well at mercury CEMs. The testing center, Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS), is used to verify commercial technology that can be used to monitor natural species and contaminants in air, water and soil (Ashley et al., 2005). Ambient ammonia sensors have recently completed its verification process, and mercury CEMs have completed two of its three phases for verification. Thanks to its partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the testing was able to be completed at USDA feeding locations, which are the largest source of atmospheric ammonia emissions in the U.S. These monitors will allow for patterns to be studied in ammonia emissions, as they relate to farm management practices and treatment. The technology is also less labor intensive and the data can be reviewed remotely, enticing more to adapt the sensors (Environmental Protection Agency, 2005). Mercury CEMs where tested by AMS and partnerships with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for their measuring ability in flue gases. AMS also verified their ability to measure emissions in Oak Ridge, Tennessee at the Toxic Substance Control Act incinerator. Lastly, in partnership with both the State of Connecticut and the Illinois Clean Coal Institute, to measure mercury CEMs at a coal-fired power plant (Ashley et al., 2005).

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