Architecture of Domes - himself. This was done, not out of...

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Domus Aurea, Rome, octagonal room
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Domus aurea, octagonal room
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Pantheon, Rome
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Pantheon, forecourt, reconstruction
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portico
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block
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rotunda
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Pantheon, Rome, painting by Panini
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Pantheon, plan
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Section of Pantheon, showing reconstruction of centering
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Pantheon, engraving by Duperac
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Also he [Agrippa] completed the building called the Pantheon. It has this name, perhaps because it received among the images which decorated it the statues of many gods, including Mars and Venus; but my own opinion of the name is that, because of its vaulted roof, it resembles the heavens. Agrippa, for his part, wished to place a statue of Augustus there also and to bestow upon him the honor of having the structure named after him; but when the emperor wouldn't accept either honor, he placed in the temple itself a statue of the former Caesar and in the ante-room statues of Augustus and
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Unformatted text preview: himself. This was done, not out of any rivalry or ambition on Agrippa's part to make himself equal to Augustus, but from his hearty loyalty to him and his constant zeal for the public good; hence Augustus, so far from censuring him for it, honored them the more. Dio Cassius Cathedral of Florence, dome by Brunelleschi St. Peters, Rome, Michelangelos dome Duperac, engraving of longitudinal section of Michelangelos dome, St. Peters Michelangelo, model for the dome of St. Peters St. Pauls, London St. Pauls, London, dome by Wren U.S. Capitol, design proposed by Benjamin Latrobe, 1806 Design for expansion by Thomas Walter, 1851 Design for expansion and new dome, by Thomas Walter, 1855 Statue of Freedom, U.S. Capitol dome Max Abramovitz, Assembly Hall, 1967 Abramovitz, Assembly Hall, 1967...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ARCH 21- taught by Professor Minor during the Spring '06 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Architecture of Domes - himself. This was done, not out of...

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