4_10_08 - Intimate Violence Marcy A. Carlone, MA Saint...

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Intimate Violence Marcy A. Carlone, MA Saint Joseph College Victimology April 10, 2008
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Judith Herman (Trauma & Recovery, 1992) describes: The core experiences of trauma are disempowerment and disconnection from others. Recovery, therefore, is based on the empowerment of the survivor (regaining control) and the creation of new connections
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Battered Women’s Syndrome Battered Women’s Syndrome is considered to be a form of Posttraumatic Stress. Battered Women’s Syndrome is a recognized psychological condition that is used to describe someone who has been the victim of consistent and/or severe domestic violence. To be classified as a battered woman, a woman has to have been through two cycles of abuse.
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Battered Women’s Syndrome Cycle of Abuse Cycle of abuse is abuse that occurs in a repeating pattern. Abuse is identifiable as being cyclical in two ways: it is both generational and episodic . Generational cycles of abuse are passed down, by example and exposure, from parents to children. Episodic abuse occurs in a repeating pattern within the context of at least two individuals within a family system. It may involve spousal abuse, child abuse, or even elder abuse.  
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Battered Women’s Syndrome There are four stages of Battered Women’s Syndrome: Stage One–Denial Stage one of battered women's syndrome occurs when the battered woman denies to others, and to herself, that there is a problem. Most battered women will make up excuses for why their partners have an abusive incident. Battered women will generally believe that the abuse will never happen again.
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Battered Women’s Syndrome Stage Two–Guilt Stage two of battered women's syndrome occurs when a battered woman truly recognizes or acknowledges that there is a problem in her relationship. She recognizes she has been the victim of abuse and that she may be beaten again. During this stage, most battered women will take on the blame or responsibility of any beatings they may receive. Battered women will begin to question their own characters and try harder to live up their partners “expectations.”
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Battered Women’s Syndrome Stage Three-Enlightenment Stage three of battered women's syndrome occurs when a battered woman starts to understand that no one deserves to be beaten. A battered woman comes to see that the beatings she receives from her partner are not justified. She also recognizes that her partner has a serious problem. However, she stays with her abuser in an attempt to keep the relationship in tact with hopes of future change.
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Stage Four–Responsibility Stage four of battered women's syndrome occurs when a battered woman recognizes that her abuser has a problem that only he can fix. Battered women in this stage come to understand that nothing they can do or say can help their abusers. Battered women in this stage choose to take the
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYC 245 taught by Professor Mc during the Spring '08 term at St. Joseph CT.

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4_10_08 - Intimate Violence Marcy A. Carlone, MA Saint...

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