Blauner lecture on colonized and immigrant

Blauner lecture on colonized and immigrant - Blauner,...

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Blauner, “Colonized and Immigrant Minorities” The Third World: Name for the less economically developed parts of the world established in 1955 In 1968 racial minorities in the US worked to forge an anticolonialist alliance, then called the “third world movement” Since that time racially oppressed people in the US have been so identified by radical groups. Central in this essay is the question whether the term “third world” can indeed be applied to people in the US, i.e. domestically. Blauner examines three assumptions forming the basis of this claim: 1) America’s racial groups are of colonized origin 2) “racial minorities share a common situation of oppression” 3) there are historical links between the “domestic” and “international” third world 1. Colonialism vs. Immigration Universal features of the colonial situation: Forced entry into the new society Subjection to unfree labor Fragmentation or destruction of cultural heritage Native Americans, Chicanos and Blacks European Immigrants: Jews and Irish Conquered or Captured Voluntary entry Traditional vs. internal colonization / \ Native American/Chicano Blacks Involuntary Incorporation: subject to coercion
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course SOC 1376 taught by Professor Barton during the Spring '08 term at Temple.

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Blauner lecture on colonized and immigrant - Blauner,...

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