iii.docx - Reply Reply to Week 5 Discussion Board Collapse Patil Karthic Patil Sep 25 at 1:11am Manage Discussion Entry A wireless network is a computer

iii.docx - Reply Reply to Week 5 Discussion Board Collapse...

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Reply Reply to Week 5 Discussion Board Collapse Subdiscussion Karthic Patil Karthic Patil Sep 25, 2020Sep 25 at 1:11am Manage Discussion Entry A wireless network is a computer network that allows computerized devices to communicate without needing a physical medium connection like the cables (Vela, Kraus, Friedman, Irizarry & Suman, 2018). A wireless access point (WAPs) establishes wireless networks. WAP can be described as a hardware device that allows computerized devices and other Wi-Fi devices to connect to the network. WAPs are connected to a wired network through a router. WAPs include antennae and radio transmitters that facilitate the connection between the computer devices in the network. WAPs mostly use Wi-Fi standards. The security in the network is very important. The main wireless security concepts I have learned from the video are explained below: Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP)- WEP is a security protocol that is in place to ensure that there are privacy and security in the wireless network. WEP was released in 1997, with the intention of providing wireless communication with the same level of privacy and security as in wired communication (Mohapatra & Prakash, 2010). WEP has some weaknesses: weak encryption, no authentication, and shared static keys. This makes it weak, making it easier to be cracked by attackers. Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA)- due to the weaknesses experienced in wired equivalent privacy, there was a need for a more secure protocol. WPA is a security protocol used to secure computerized devices with internet connections (Kwon & Choi, 2020). WPA uses a dynamic encryption key and strong encryption. It also includes authentication. All these features make it the best security choice when compared to WEP. References Kwon, S., & Choi, H. (2020). Evolution of Wi-Fi Protected Access: Security Challenges. IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine , 1-1. doi: 10.1109/mce.2020.3010778 Mohapatra, A., & Prakash, N. (2010). Wired equivalent privacy reinvestigated. Journal Of Discrete Mathematical Sciences And Cryptography , 13 (2), 141-151. doi: 10.1080/09720529.2010.10698282
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Vela, M., Kraus, J., Friedman, S., Irizarry, M., & Suman, P. (2018). Estimating the effect of network element events in a wireless network. EURASIP Journal On Wireless Communications And Networking , 2018 (1). doi: 10.1186/s13638-018-1098-1 Reply Reply to Comment o Collapse Subdiscussion Sujita Bhatta Sujita Bhatta Sep 30, 2020Sep 30 at 1:08pm Manage Discussion Entry Hi Kathic, You have some great points. I would also like to add few more points on this. In order to provide security and to transmit data, 802.11 introduced the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) protocol, thus trying to bring the security level of wireless systems similar to a wired network. Provides security by encrypting data over radio frequency waves, so its protected as its transmitted from end point to end point (Posey, 2003). It works by using secret keys or codes to encrypt data and both access point and client must know the codes in order for it to function. However, there have been many flaws with WEP’s intended security goals with as found by a group of researchers from the University of California at Berkeley and Zero-Knowledge (Mehta, 2001). These flaws
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  • Fall '14
  • Smith,R
  • Wi-Fi, Wireless access point, Wi-Fi Protected Access, Wired Equivalent Privacy, WEP

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