TheNewPoetry_ModuleReview_DI.pdf - Student Name Angel...

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Unformatted text preview: Student Name: Angel Ibanez The New Poetry Module Review DIRECTIONS: These questions are similar to essay questions you will see on the module exam. To make sure you’re ready for the exam, write 3‐4 complete sentences in response to each of the questions below. 1. What were themes, forms, and poetic devices common to poetry written during the first half of the century? There are many common themes, forms, and poetic devices associated with poetry written during the first half of the century. Regionalism, Imagism, Modernism, and the Harlem Renaissance Movement were all very influential and greatly impacted the kind of poetry written at this time. Many poets focused on what they knew of the people and events/situations around them. In his poetry, Robert Frost focused on life in rural New England. Carl Sandburg wrote poetry about Chicago. Poets like T.E. Hulme were influenced by Imagism. Modernism was another movement that influenced a lot of the work produced at this time. Modernists focused on “making it new”. Meaning they aimed to avoid imitating other poets' ideas and expressions. The Harlem Renaissance was another influential movement. Artists, writers, and musicians in Harlem began to work together, expressing their ideas on racial identity, oppression, and equality (among other things) through their respective art forms. During this time, throughout all of the movements, themes of identity and the modern world challenging people's understanding of it. Another common theme was writing local, many writers during this era really focused on creating characters and settings representative of a specific region. With Modernist poetry making up a large number of the work produced during this era, forms and poetic devices tended to be less traditional and more experimental. Often, poets of 2. How did Modernist poets use “white space” to enhance the meaning of their works? this time used metaphors, repetition, and personification to create powerful works. (Mention at least three examples.) Many Modernist poets were straying from traditional forms and experimenting with White Spaces in poems are simply spaces within a line of poetry, usually inserted more modern forms, (such free and “making it new”. as a guide to the reader on as how to verse), pace the reading of the poem. They aimed to be authentic and to make their work their own which meant seeing poetry that was quite from traditional works. Someofpoets, however, such as Robert Frost, It candifferent also be used to modify the meaning a poem or to elicit a "pause" and " preferred to stay true to more traditional forms (like iambic pentameter). Poets like reflection" from the reader. Robert Frost, whose work was still representative of Regionalism and Realism, continued to write more meterfor and rhyme and branching out to White space is to awith poet whatregular the "pause effect" is to theavoid orator. free verse and more experimental forms. And some poets simply didn’t adhere to or prefer any specific form, like Carl Sandburg. Sandburg once said, “If it jells into free verse, all right. If it jells into rhyme, all right.” Student Name: Angel Ibanez The New Poetry Module Review 3. How did the “regional” Modernists portray their respective parts of the country? “Regional” Modernists portrayed their respective parts of the country how they perceived them. They wrote what they knew from living in that area; their (at times stereotypical) perception of the people and places surrounding them. Regional Modernist poets characterized the particular region and aimed to embody the people, landscapes, and cultures of that area. Poets like Robert Frost and Carl Sandburg, for example, immersed themselves in the locations they wrote about. Much of Robert Frost's poetry centered on life in rural New England and Carl Sandburg wrote about his perceptions of life in Chicago and the activities, cultures, and concerns in that region. ...
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