Paul's Chapter 3 Study Focus Questions - 8,9,10

Paul's Chapter 3 Study Focus Questions - 8,9,10 -...

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8. According to the response deprivation hypothesis, when your Dr. Pepper is limited below your baseline level (8 ounces/day) then you will change your behavior to gain as much access to it as you had before. The downside is, though, that you will not “learn” to do the running as a new behavior and the Dr. Pepper will not act as a reinforcer to the behavior, you will only be doing it to gain access to the Dr. Pepper again. 9. Research indicating that a conditioned response and an unconditioned response may be dissimilar speaks to the proposal that the conditioned response may be more of an adaptive response than a mere reflex to the conditioned stimulus. Several physiological findings were sited to support this claim. These compensatory conditional responses are clear in the instance of drug abuse. For example, sight of the needle (CS) produces
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Unformatted text preview: physiological changes (CR) in the opposite direction of the drug, physiologically preparing the body for incoming narcotics. The result is a need for increased levels of the drug to reach desired effect. The CR (compensatory physiological changes) and the UR (craving for the drug) are dissimilar and ultimately can lead to addiction. Treatment implications include that extinction must occur in the presence of common conditioned stimuli that may include certain friends, family members, and landmarks, not simply the needle. 10. According to Garcias experiments, different species have different modes of acquiring taste aversions, depending on what is needed for survival. Thus, rats need a taste cue to gather info on their possible intake of food, while quails as a species have only needed the sight of the food to survive....
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