rlo - Throughout history, Ancient Egypt and its southern...

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Throughout history, Ancient Egypt and its southern neighbor of Nubia have fought constantly for control over one of the most prosperous and highly desired trade routes, the Nile River. Towards the end of the Middle Kingdom, the Nubian state of Kerma was able to take advantage of the inner sociopolitical turmoil that was taking place in Egypt and gained control over the lower Nile in Egypt. However, after several attacks, Egypt was able to regain control of the Nile and also proceeded to colonize Kerma. Through skeletal and cultural analysis of the remains at the sites of Kerma and Tombos, the article "Traumatic Injuries and Imperialism: The Effects of Egyptian Colonial Strategies at Tombos in Upper Nubia" by Michele R. Buzon and Rebecca Richman asserts the idea that after the conquer of Kerma during the Middle Kingdom, Egyptian colonial strategy was modified from violent interpersonal domination to a more diplomatic approach during the New Kingdom. The sites of Kerma and Tombos were compared and provided substantial evidence of a
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Sinclair during the Spring '08 term at University of Tennessee.

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rlo - Throughout history, Ancient Egypt and its southern...

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