W2 Discussion Post.pdf - Butts B J Rich L K(2018 Philosophies and theories for advanced nursing practice(3rd ed Burlington MA Jones Bartlett Learning

W2 Discussion Post.pdf - Butts B J Rich L K(2018...

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Butts, B. J. & Rich, L. K. (2018). Philosophies and theories for advanced nursing practice (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Chapters 5, 7 NURSING’S PATTERNS OF KNOWING Barbara Carper (1978) conducted a philosophical analysis of early nursing literature and identified four fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing: ( 1) empirics, the science of nursing; (2) ethics, the component of moral knowledge in nursing; (3) the component of personal knowing in nursing; and (4) aesthetics, the art of nursing. Carper’s analysis opened the way for a broad, comprehensive, and holistic view of nursing knowledge and nursing practice beyond the confines of empirics or science alone. However, as nurse scholars and practitioners began to delve further into the broader fundamental understandings that form a foundation for nursing, it became increasingly clear that there is yet another pattern of knowing that has long been a foundation for nursing practice. This realm of knowing, first identified in the literature by White (1995), was identified as sociopolitical knowing. Later, Chinn and Kramer (2007) developed a conceptualization of emancipatory knowing that embraced White’s conceptualization but expanded it to emphasize the nature of this pattern of knowing as expressed in nursing. In addition, Chinn and Kramer used the term emancipatory to emphasize the driving force underpinning this pattern of knowing—the universal human longing for liberation from those circumstances that limit human potential. The contributing authors in Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatory Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis (Kagan et al., 2014) provide a comprehensive collection of works advancing emancipatory nursing as a distinct and essential approach to practice that leads to fundamental changes in social and political structures in which health and well-being are embedded. All patterns of knowing in nursing have both a knowing dimension and a being/doing dimension. The knowing (epistemological) dimension addresses how we come to know or understand things and what is required to admit something as knowledge. In all disciplines, methods and standards for conducting those methods exist so that the members of the discipline can agree on what is valid knowledge and what is not (meaning those things that are considered myths, falsehoods, or misconceptions). In nursing, practitioners rely on fundamental knowledge that has been verified as valid and reliable in related disciplines, as

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