BIS2C_Lect26_Ward_Development___Sponges_ppt

The choanocyte then loses its collar and flagellum

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Unformatted text preview: uring feeding). The choanocyte then loses its collar and flagellum and migrates through the mesohyl as an ameboid cell, transporting the sperm to the oocyte”. When confronted with a sperm from another sponge species: - an unknown mechanism acts as it's just another food particle Sponge features: biology Sexual reproduction Brusca & Brusca (1990): “This rather impressive feat initially involves sperm capture by choanocytes and enclosure in an intracellular vesicle (much like the formation of food vacuole during feeding) The choanocyte then loses of a food vacuole during feeding). The choanocyte then loses its collar and flagellum and migrates through the mesohyl as an ameboid cell, transporting the sperm to the oocyte”. Sponge features: biology Sexual reproduction Fertilized egg (zygote) cleavage blastula-like stage. Embryo retained on parent sponge for some period of time, then released as swimming (ciliated) larva, which eventually settles and develops into an adult form. “Choanocytes no doubt regularly consume the unlucky sperm of different species of sponges … but, by some as yet undiscovered recognition mechanism, they respond with a remarkably different behavior...
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This note was uploaded on 08/07/2012 for the course BIS BIS 2C taught by Professor 3differentprofs during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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