CH 10 - ADOLESCENT AND ADULT DEVELOPMENT

CH 10 - ADOLESCENT AND ADULT DEVELOPMENT - Adolescent and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Adolescent and Adult Development Chapter 10 Lifespan perspective:  the view that changes happen throughout the entire human  lifespan, literally from “womb to tomb.”  Erik Erikson proposed the only major theory of development to include the entire  lifespan. (see Table 10.1 on page 478)  According to Erikson, individuals progress through eight psychosocial stages during the  lifespan. Lifespan Perspective Each stage is defined by a conflict that arises from the individual’s relationship with the  social environment and that must be resolved satisfactorily in order for healthy  personality development to occur. Erikson believed that a healthy adult personality depends on acquiring the appropriate  basic attitudes in the proper sequence during childhood and adolescence. ERIKSON’S PSYCHOSOCIAL STAGES 1. Trust vs. mistrust  (birth to 2) 2. Autonomy vs. shame and doubt  (ages 2-3) 3. Initiative vs. guilt  (age 3-5) 4. Industry vs. inferiority  (ages 6-11)  5. Identity vs. role confusion  (ages 12-18) 6. Intimacy vs. isolation  (ages 18-24) 7. Generativity vs. stagnation  (age 25-64) 8. Ego-integrity vs. despair  (age 65 to death)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ADOLESCENCE Stage that begins at puberty and encompasses the period from the end of childhood to  the beginning of adulthood Puberty A period of several years with rapid growth, physical changes culminating in  sexual maturity Average Age of Puberty 10 years old for girls Ranges from 7 to 14 years of age 12 years old for boys Ranges from 9 to 16 years of age Begins with hormone surge followed by growth spurt Girls growth spurt between ages 10-13 years of age Boys growth spurt between ages 12-15 years of age Girls reach full height between ages 16-17 Boys reach full height between ages 18-20  PUBERTY Every person’s individual timetable for puberty is influenced primarily by heredity,  although environmental factors, such as diet and exercise, also exert some influence. Puberty begins with a surge in hormone production, which, in turn, causes a number of  physical changes. Secondary sex characteristics:  those physical characteristics that are not directly  involved in reproduction, but distinguish the mature male from the mature female. The major landmark of puberty for males is the first ejaculation; for females it is  menarche , the onset of menstruation.
Background image of page 2
The Timing of Puberty Secondary Sex Characteristics      Physical characteristics not involved in reproduction that distinguish males from  females Females       Breasts develop Hips round     Pubic and under-arm hair
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYC 101 taught by Professor Cusaac during the Spring '08 term at South Carolina.

Page1 / 25

CH 10 - ADOLESCENT AND ADULT DEVELOPMENT - Adolescent and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online