roaring twenties KKK - Giroud 1 Xavi Giroud Grimble U.S History(5A The Other Side of the Roaring Twenties From the perspective of an Imperial Wizards

roaring twenties KKK - Giroud 1 Xavi Giroud Grimble U.S...

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Giroud 1 Xavi Giroud Grimble U.S. History (5A) April 13, 2011 The Other Side of the Roaring Twenties: From the perspective of an Imperial Wizard’s wife The Foreground I, Bam Hill, married a Vanderbilt attendee, Hiram Wesley Evans, on February 5, 1923. Hiram, like any other Ku Klux Klan member, grew up in the south, and worked a regular job before entering the cause. Hiram worked as a dentist in Texas for twenty years, until the height of the “roaring twenties.” Things weren’t the same in the south. Though America was experiencing a boom in the economy, little money flowed into the south, and we were the ones that suffered. My husband had joined the Klan three years before we wed. Most of his time was devoted to the Klan, and he quickly grew to a position of power, eventually directing over two million members. My husband reached the highest rank, Imperial Wizard, in 1922. From then on, our home was filled with the beliefs of the Klan. My husband was nativist. In other words, he placed himself away from the Roman Catholics, the Jews, the immigrants, the Negroes, and the Communists. Thus making him, and his Klan, extremely American. They stood up for their country, and would stop at nothing to protect it. My husband supported the great movements of our nation, the temperance movement and prohibition. My husband was part of the regulation of the south, and always worked for the improvement of our country. The violent acts, such as the writing of ‘KKK’ on a Negroes forehead with acid, were just the fixation of the standard. He “has done this without prejudice, or any preconceived attitude. There is no hatred in [his] heart for any individual, nationality or race upon the face of the earth today. [He] loves all humanity; for that reason [his] supreme love is for America” (Evans 8). The Klan was very much influenced by the conclusion of World War One. After America returned victorious, the rest of the world was torn to pieces. We all read from the newspapers that the government was resorting to isolationism. My husband jumped into position. It was the Klan’s duty to keep America the way it should be, and that is a country filled with only true Americans. Foreign peoples meant foreign ideals and commitment to something non-American. “Together, the South with its negro problem, the New York-New England section with its hordes of inferior immigrants, [were] largely responsible for much of the political prostitution that [was] a curse to our country” (Evans 10). My husband once said, “This nation is our home. We built it. We protected it. We should and do cherish it beyond all other possessions…Patriotism, real patriotism, it not sentiment; it is the overflowing of the spirit of family life into national life” (Evans 18). I know, personally, that we must protect our land from ending up like Europe, so we had to come together, the South and the Klan, to stand up for what is right.

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