Cultural Anthropology Unit 4.pdf - Cultural Anthropology Chapter Four The Social and Cultural Construction of Reality Vocabulary Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

Cultural Anthropology Unit 4.pdf - Cultural Anthropology...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 8 pages.

Cultural Anthropology Chapter Four The Social and Cultural Construction of Reality Vocabulary How does language affect the meanings people assign to experience? Each language constitutes a frame of reference that orders a particular people’s view of the world The relationship between language and thought can exist as various levels. The most obvious is at the level of vocabulary Ex. the Inuit have a variety of words for different kinds of snow, whereas we only have one In English grammar, time occupies the same grammatical space as food, in this sense our grammar reflects, reinforces, and perhaps determines our general view of the world as consisting of objects or substances, with everything perceived as an attribute of some object. Borrowing Meaning with Metaphors One major characteristic of human language is its economy. The same words we use to describe one area of experiences can also be used to describe another area. If this were no so, we would need a distinct vocabulary for every distinct experience we wished to describe Metaphor-taking linguistic expressions from one area of experience and applying them to another “Shoulder of the road” and “The food of the mountain” “Ellie is a snake” “Sally is a fox” “Marissa is a dog” Metaphors take language from one domain of experience, such as the domain of the body of the domain of animals. And apply it to another domain, such as landscape features or persons. Meaning is also extended whin language is extended from one domain to another Metaphor involves not only speaking of one experiences in terms of another but also understanding one experience in terms of another. Ex. When you speak about argument, we might say “his point was right on target” or :she attacked my argument, and I hd to defend my position” or “she shot down my argument” or “I think I won the argument We speak about argument in terms of war Metaphors are not simply verbal devices that we use to make our own language colorful and economical rather they are like theories, templates, lenses, or filters we can used to help us understand one domain of experience in terms of another. The fact that americans borrow so heavily from the domains of war, sports, and economic exchange for metaphors suggests another way to understand how language relates to influence people's views of the world.--Key Metaphors. Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis The idea that there is an explicit link between the grammar of a language and the culture of the people who speak that language. Metaphor A figure of speech in which linguistic expressions are taken from one area of experience and applied to another Domain of Experience An area of human experience (e.g., business, war, science, family life) from which people borrow meaning ato apply to other areas Key Metaphors Metaphors that dominate the meaning that people in a specific culture attribute to their experience Myth A story of narrative that portrays the meaning people give to their experience Interpretive drift

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture