Wk%204%20Lec%202sf-1 - Mitosis Cancer Meiosis...

This preview shows page 1 - 10 out of 60 pages.

What were we talking about? Cellular reproduction Mitosis Cancer Meiosis Non-disjunction 
Chapter 9 Patterns of Inheritance
Mendel’s Contribution Mendel was a monk who lived and worked in an abbey in  Austria Mendel was a good biologist who was also strongly  quantitative, therefore much of his work has stood the test  of time, because it was done very precisely He studied garden peas which are easy to grow and  available in many readily distinguishable varieties Mendel had success because 1. Focused on a few traits (7) 2. Documented and quantified results 3. Chose the garden pea  Pisium sativum   as his subject
Mendel’s Experimental Design Mendel was able to exercise strict control over plant  matings  He could always be sure of the parentage of new plants  Mendel’s success was due not only to his experimental  approach and choice of organism, but also to his  selection  of characteristics to study He chose to follow seven characteristics, each of which  occurs in  two distinct forms   Mendel worked with his plants until he was sure he had  true-breeding  varieties – that is, varieties for which self- fertilization produced offspring  identical to the parent  
Mendel’s Experimental Design • Mendel allowed the F 1  offspring to  self-fertilize or fertilize each other to  produce the next generation of plants  • The F 2  generation
The Results  Mendel’s Law of Segregation Mendel performed many experiments in  which he tracked the inheritance of a  single characteristic such as flower color  If you start with a cross between a pea  plant with purple flowers and one with white flowers, this is called a  monohybrid cross  because  the parent plants differ in  only one characteristic Mendel discovered that F 1  plants ( monohybrids ) produced by these two true-breeding parents all  had truly purple flowers So, was the heritable factor for white flowers now lost as a result of hybridization?  
The Results Mendel found the answer to be NO! Out of 929 F 2  plants, Mendel found that 705  (about 3/4) had purple flowers and 224 (about  ¼ ) had white flowers, a ratio of about three  plants with purple flowers to every one with  white flowers in the F 2  generation  Mendel concluded that the heritable factor for  white flowers did not disappear in the F 1  plants,  but that only the  purple-flower factor was  affecting F 1  flower color He also deduced that the F 1  plants must have  carried  two factors  for the flower-color  characteristic,  one for purple and one for white
Mendel’s hypotheses  (stated in modern terms) Mendel developed four hypotheses based on his results 1. There are  alternative forms of  genes, the units that determine heritable traits, for example,  the gene for flower color in pea plants exists in one form for purple and another for white,  these  alternative forms  are called  alleles   2. For each inherited characteristic, an organism has  two genes , one from each parent. These  genes may both be the 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture