Irony And The Tragic Dilemma In Doctor Faustus.pdf - UNIT ~ ~ R O N AND Y THE TRAGIC DILEMMA IN DOCTOR FA USTUS Structure Objectives Introduction Nature

Irony And The Tragic Dilemma In Doctor Faustus.pdf - UNIT ~...

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UNIT ~ ~ R O N Y AND THE TRAGIC DILEMMA IN DOCTOR FA USTUS Structure Objectives Introduction : Nature and Definition of irony Marlowe: An ironist Irony of Faustus aspirations Faustus' trag~c dilemma Self -~nultipl~cat~ve Irony in Doctor Faustus Summing Up rrag~c irony and dilemma in Doctor Fuu,\ttr~. References Keywords Quest~ons Annotations Suggested Readings - 3.0 OBJECTIVES This unit helps you to understand irony as the distinguishing feature of Doctor Faustus'tragedy and how the essence of irony and tragedy lies in a dilemma with which Doctor Faustus dies without being able to resolve it. - - 3.1 NATURE & DEFINITION OF IRONY ' I n the preceding unit, we discussed how Doctor Faustus ho,~', a sort of balance of opposites between the morality and the heroic strains of traprdy This opposit~onal balance is not s~mply thematic or intellectual but is the core of drama. and pal-t~cularly that of tragedy. defined as Irony. The subtlety of irony, in the for111 of a f l u x of opposite experiences distiiigu~shes a good play from an inferior one and, to an extent, drama Itself, which attempts to real~ze the human paradoxes in the dramatic actlon, and distinguishes itself from other genres of literature Dramatic irony is an intermediary between the subjectivelv felt ironles ot experience on the part of the dramatist and the objectively found iron~es of the world Understood textually, dramatic irony refers to the p o s \ ~ h ~ l ~ t e ~ jf a lriultivocal or a pr~v~leged reading as against a popular read~ng of a pla! that 14 not ava~lable to the character and, at times, to the playwr~ght himself. Rena~\rr~~ce drama favours Irony
Doctor Frrirstirs or an ironic reading by virtue of its transitional experie~rce wherein the acceptance of medieval values has become uncomfortable and, at the' same time, there is a ' hesitation to accept the aspirations of the new age. Consequently, the transitional experience of the times required a dralnatic strategy or trope that woi~ld play an uncharacteristic role of remaining subtly evasive instead of standardizing the dramatic experience. The term irony was given literary sophistication by Friedrich Schleger in the nineteenth century. He liberated the term from "simple verbal raillery" to explain tlle paradoxes in Shakespeare and the ro~naritic poets. In Schlegel's understanding, Bert 0. States writes: Irony was the highest principle of art, and the poet stands iro~iically above his creation, as God does above his own; the creation is utterly objective in character, and yet it reveals the subject~ve wisdom, will and love of the creator. Thus the author pervades his characters and their actions but he is never subjectively identifiable with thenl. Like God, he always expresses less than he thinks.' Crediting irony with an infinitely variable strategy for encompassing nature's possibilites and an ability to silmmon "vital ter~s~on-prodi~cing mechanism of dramatic action", Bert 0. States attempts to define irony: By irony, in its widest context, I do not refer to that negativity of attitude we

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