Annotated Bibliography-2.docx - Davis 1 Wayne Davis English 112 Annotated Bibliography Professor Hillis Gof Davis 2 Annotated Bibliography Abstract The

Annotated Bibliography-2.docx - Davis 1 Wayne Davis English...

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Davis 1 Wayne Davis English 112 Annotated Bibliography Professor Hillis Gof April 28, 2020
Davis 2 Annotated Bibliography Abstract: The leaders of utopian societies never plan for their society to turn dystopic. However, in every novel, societies always become dystopic due to the leaders abusing their power. They believe what they are doing is correct when actually, it has detrimental efects to their community. Research plans to look at the leaders of these dystopian societies and how they have abused their power. Brooks, Thom. “Knowledge and Power in Plato’s Political Thought.” International Journal of Philosophical Studies, vol. 14, no. 1, 2006, pp. 51–77. Thom Brooks is writing about Plato and his two distinct political ideas, his ‘ideal political philosophy’ and his ‘practical political philosophy.’ The first is where kings rule in absolute power over his subjects. They rule because of their superior knowledge and comprehension. However, this can lead to the dystopic ideals which I am going to discuss. Kings could abuse their power to get what they desire. The second is where this king is undermined by others in his community. If others also possess the knowledge of the king, then they will not allow him to become an absolute and rule without accountability. Brooks points out that Plato realizes how his ideal political thought is dangerous leading him to approve of his practical political theory. This is a primary article in the abuse of power and how that could afect a society. What
Davis 3 would Plato think about today's government? Does it have too much power over the citizens? CLAEYS, GREGORY. DYSTOPIA: a Natural History . OXFORD UNIV Press, 2018. This novel discuses dystopias in detail, ranging from Satan’s Triumphant March to Nazi Germany and the ‘Final Solution’ to Post-Totalitarian Dystopia. This would be a primary source throughout the novel. It relates to Utopianism: a Very Short Introduction through the description of Hitler and Stalin’s real-world dystopias. It dives deep into 1984 and the meaning behind the novel. Cambodia’s genocide, led by Pol Pot, is one of the least discussed real-world dystopias in history. Pol Pot abused his power and decided to eradicate the ‘others’ much like Hitler. Although it does not talk about equality like Plato’s “The Republic”, there are some similarities in relation to governmental power. Chapter 4 talks about totalitarianism in the mid-twentieth century and how that led to a decrease in power given to governments. Quotes from this source could be used in every paragraph because it covers such a wide range of topics and relates to many other sources.

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