[M3S1-SUPPLEMENTARY] Sampling.pdf - SAMpling Sampling...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 5 pages.

S AM p l in g Sampling addresses the questions “Who or what is in your study? Where are you getting your data or content?” Typically, discussions of sampling center around who is in your study the subjects, respondents, participants, or collaborators; Sampling is the process by which you select several individual cases from a larger population. The first thing you need to do is determine the elements in your study. An element is the kind of person, group, or nonliving item in which you are interested (sometimes the word unit or case is used). Next you must identify the population. A population is a group of elements about which you might later make claims. For example, if you are interested in exploring the qualities that draw some college students to social activism, the element in your study is individual college students involved in social activism . The population you might later make claims about is all college students who engage in social activism . Once you have identified the element you are interested in and the population, you will need to determine the study population (sometimes called the sampling frame ). The study population is the group of elements from which you draw your sample. So, if the population you are interested in is “all college students who engage in social activism,” clearly it would be impossible to draw a sample from that population, which is not only large but diffuse. Therefore, you create a study population. Your study population may consist of all students at two identified local colleges who are engaged in a specific club or program after school. You then draw a sample from the study population. A sample is the number of individual cases that you ultimately draw and from which/whom you generate data. How do you determine what the sample size should be? How many individual cases do you need? Sample size varies dramatically, from studies involving a single case to those involving thousands. Guiding questions to determine what size is appropriate are: How many cases do you need to answer your research questions or hypothesis? What resources do you have available (monetary and time)? What research method or methods are you using? What are the corresponding norms when using that method?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture