SYLLABUS_ASB337_FALL2020B.pdf - MAIN CAMPUS PO BOX 872402...

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THIS CONTENT IS PROTECTED AND MAY NOT BE SHARED, UPLOADED, SOLD, OR DISTRIBUTED. 1 Note: this syllabus is not a contract. It is subject to further change or revision, to best realize the educational goals of the course. Revisions will be announced in class or in course materials online with appropriate prior notice. ASM 337: PYRAMIDS AND HIEROGLYPHS Fall (B) 2020 Line Numbers: 95534-95535 Instructor: Dr. Laura Bidner Contact Info: [email protected] Office Hours: Wednesday 9am – 11am on Zoom Please email me any time with questions or to set up an online meeting outside of office hours! Teaching Assistants For students whose last names/surnames start with: A – K: Dean Blumenfeld (email: [email protected] ) L – Z: Alexandra Ptacek (emal: [email protected] ) TA Office hours: Email your assigned TA via ASU email with questions or to schedule an online meeting. Course Description: This course is an introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica, one of the great world civilizations and home to some of the most intriguing native peoples of the Americas, including hunters, farmers, merchants, seafarers, priests, metallurgists, astronomers, servants, slaves, politicians, and warriors. These people lived in small camps and huge cities and spoke an array of languages. Concepts familiar to us as rank and as strange as human sacrifice were integral to these cultures. This course focuses on cultural developments prior to European contact. It concentrates on the major processes of social change witnessed archaeologically through four periods—the Archaic, Formative, Classic, and Postclassic, and across four major regions—the Maya area, central Mexico, the Valley of Oaxaca, and West Mexico. At the end of this 8000-year sequence, the Aztecs and other groups emerged in a time of social, political and linguistic upheaval. We look at competing explanations of important developments, such as the origins of agriculture and the formation of the earliest cities, states and empires. Course Format: This three-credit class is taught online, in modular format. There are seven online modules in this course with weekly due dates. Each module includes readings, lectures, a quiz and either a submitted assignment or a virtual field trip. Course Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, each student will have demonstrated that they are able to: Identify Mesoamerican cultural traditions including their geographic regions, ethnic groups, and linguistic units Describe major developmental periods of past Mesoamerican cultures, such as the Classic Maya, in terms of their distinctive characteristics, when and where they occurred, and how they ended. Critically evaluate hypotheses on how factors such as maize agriculture, writing, and warfare affected the trajectories of past Mesoamerican lifeways.

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