G-3_Egypt-1.docx - GUIDE 3 Unit 1 For Chapter 3 Egypt from...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

GUIDE 3 Unit 1 For Chapter 3: Egypt from Narmer to Cleopatra Your name: EGYPTIAN ART Children of the Deceased (detail of a limestone relief) , Tomb of Ramose in Thebes,1375 B.C . Egypt’s impact on later cultures was immense. You could say that Egypt provided the building blocks for Greek and Roman culture, and, through them, influenced all of the Western tradition. Today, Egyptian imagery, concepts, and perspectives are found everywhere; you will find them in architectural forms, on money, and in our day to day lives. [ Source ] 2017 Guides for Gardner’s ART through the AGES textbook by F. S. Kleiner can be used exclusively for learning activities in Art 101 and Art 102 classes taught by O. Nosova at TNCC, Virginia. 1
My Introductory Notes Many students find Egyptian art a fascinating subject. I hope you, too, have enjoyed this section. This section is extensive. If you feel overwhelmed, you can skip some questions – for example, if it is not easy to extract the essentials. IN any event, try to have breaks – not to do work in one day. Amnd of course, you can always go with short notes. Let me begin with a brief summation of the essential points. In contrast to the diversity of the Near East, the Egyptians created a remarkably stable civilization that endured without major changes for some 3000 years. Three aspects of Egyptian culture stand as unique: 1. Close link to religion 2. Focus on afterlife 3. Strict conventionalism [Meaning that Egyptian art was based on traditions and conventions (rules) and had hardly changed in the entire three thousand long history of Egypt] There are two nice terms used: Fertile Crescent - to designate the lush land between the Tigris and Euphrates (as you already know it as Mesopotamia) Fertile Ribbon – reserved for the valley of the Nile River in Egypt. Why fertile? - Because these lands had been enriched by the annual floods. The agriculture in the ancient civilizations critically depended on the floods and fertilization they provided. There were three major periods in the history of Egypt: Old Kingdom – Middle Kingdom -New Kingdom Period Dates Millennium Old Kingdom c. 2575- 2134 B.C. 3 rd millennium B.C. Middle Kingdom c. 2040 - 1640 B.C. 2 nd millennia* B.C. (first half) New Kingdom c. 1550-1070 B.C. 2 nd millennium B.C. (second half) Make sure you understand about the first and second halves of millennium B.C. (in the BC era, times goes kind of “backward”). Again, I will not be asking you about the exact dates of the works of art but you should know the approximate timeline in millennia ( plural for millennium) If you do not feel confident with the dates take the time to do the Dating exercise (optional, extra credit; posted under Assignments). It is always helpful to draw a linear timeline. Try it. Your Notes Reminder: - Read section and summarize its material in a few lines, focusing on 3-5 key issues (for each question).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture