Bridge course, Module2.docx - Module 2 Classroom Management...

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Module 2Classroom Management2.1 IntroductionGood classroom management encourages learning. As you noticed in the previous module, a goodteacher plays many roles in the classroom; however, the foremost role for optimum classroommanagement is Organizer. A teacher does not have unlimited resources of money and time to bestserve the needs of his students; therefore, he has to make certain decisions in order to conduct hisclass as effectively as possible. Included in these choices are how to arrange the physical classroomenvironment, how to give instructions, how toelicitinformation, how to deal with problems such asstudenterrors, how to choose an appropriate text, organize activities and student interactionpatterns, and maintain a positive environment for learning.Remember in theModule 1, Section 1.2, we mentioned that insufficient authority and lack ofconfidence are potential problems for teachers. Sometimes these result from poor classroomorganization and management strategies. Conversely, spending time on preparation and organizationbuilds teacher confidence and student respect.Imagine that you walk into your first class of twelve students in Yokohama, Japan and discover thatthe 25 chairs in the classroom are all arranged in five neat rows of five chairs each and that thetwelve students are scattered about the room. They are looking at you expectantly as you stumbleabout trying to approach an individual to ask nervously, "Couldja please tell me what they call ya andsay it real slow because I just arrived in Yokohama and I don't speak a word of Japanese." Not one ofthe students responds, and they are all looking at you wondering what you said and what you want.In another, more confident scenario you walk into the same classroom, say "Hi" and ask the studentsto arrange some chairs in a semi-circle so you can approach and see every student easily. Then youbegin class by saying "My name is Jim Smith. What's your name?" The students respondimmediately. With a smile on your face and exuding the confidence of an experienced professional,you instantly instill a similar sense of confidence in your students who feel, "This is a real teacher."The difference between these two scenarios is organization, confidence, and the ability to makedecisions, in contrast to timidity, confusing instructions, poor elicitation of information, and a failureto set some basic ground rules for the conduct of a class, such as seating arrangements.As you can see from these examples, there are aspects of good class management you will need tobe familiar with in order to be an effective teacher. We will focus on six:How to arrange classroom seating to allow for the optimum flow or movement andcommunication of people in the roomHow to give effective instructions so that you are understood and do not waste time in theprocessHow to effectivelyelicitinformation from studentsHow to correcterrorsthat occur, without interrupting the learning processHow to divide classes into levelsHow to choose texts that will best serve your students

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Term
Spring
Professor
Martha Tolleson
Tags
classroom management, Teaching English as a foreign language

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