Deception in \u201cThe Tragical History of Doctor Faustus\u201d Research Paper 234324.docx - Deception in \u201cThe Tragical History of Doctor Faustus\u201d

Deception in “The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus” Research Paper 234324.docx

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Deception in “The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus” Research Paper The story of deception of Dr. Faustus starts when he desires to achieve knowledge (Frey “Antithetical Balance in the Opening and Close of Doctor Faustus”). He is depicted as a very educated and knowledgeable man, who is at the epitome of the Renaissance man. The Renaissance man is defined by notable theorists such as Abraham Maslow as an individual who has reached self-actualization. The author, Marlowe, in his quest for studying the most ambitious individuals, encountered the Renaissance “overreacher”, ( Ruickbie 15) thus, sharing his views on heroism and the power of will with his readers, at the same time, chronicling the possible loss of human beings that is often attributed by his negligent look at the abuse of office. This inspired him for writing a tragedy about Dr. Faustus. Marlowe depicts Dr. Faustus as a great individual with profound knowledge in various spheres, who wants to receive more knowledge by making agreements with the devil. In his thinking capacity, Dr. Faustus felt that the underworld god, who has created a human body, obtains plenty of valuable knowledge, including the knowledge that is forbidden. This can be associated with the fact that according to the Bible, it is the devil who contributed the idea of the forbidden fruit, thus, making Adam and Eve sin. This was the initial deception of Dr. Faustus. Another point of his self-deception was the assumption that hell does not exist. It is obvious that Dr. Faustus had a strong belief in the Elysian Fields, the place that is portrayed as being abode for the dead people, or the individuals who have been accorded immortality by the favor from the divine world. The intention of Dr. Faustus was to collect the information on various issues which were interesting to him by conducting debates with the ancient philosophers till the end of his life. The range of Faustus’ interests is rather wide and he even asks Mephistopheles to describe hell to him. Finding the answer to this question would mean renouncing God: “Why this is hell, nor am I out of it:
Think’st thou that I, who saw the face of God, And tasted the eternal joys of heaven,

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