BIO 181R notes H and G, Defense Against Disease

BIO 181R notes H and G, Defense Against Disease - Immune...

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Immune system- distinguish self from non-self and survive in a hostile environment. Individuals who survive small pox are protected from the disease. The Chinese learned that variolation or transferring pus from blisters of people with mild infections to children increased survival. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the British Ambassador to Turkey, had her children treated, and brought the technique back to Britian. A physician, Edward Jenner, who used this technique was told by a milk maid that it wasn't necessary for her since the pox they get from cows protects against smallpox. Jenner tested this idea leading to the start of immunology 205 years ago- on July 1 1796. Edward Jenner challenged the teenaged James Phipps with virulent smallpox after having vaccinated him six weeks earlier with material from a cowpox lesion on the hand of Sarah Nelmes, a milkmaid. She acquired the infection from a cow named Blossom, whose hide hangs today in St.George's Hospital in London. A link to the Edward Jenner historic site. Current immunizations: Disease Max. cases (year) 1996 cases Measles 894,000(1941) 500 Diptheria 207,000(1921) 1 Mumps 152,000(1968) 600 Small pox has been eliminated as a disease. The images of Small Pox shown below are from the Immunization Action Coalition . This site is an excellent source of information about childhood, adolescent and adult immunizations and hepatitis B educational materials.
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Definitions Innate Immunity non-specific defense mechanisms, including phagocytic cells. Adaptive Immunity specific immune responses, including antibody production by B cells and the selection of active T cells with a T cell receptor. Antigen anything causing an immune response Pathogen disease causing microorganism Tolerance non-reactivity of the immune system to self Autoimmunity immune reaction to self, failure of tolerance Chemokines released by pathogens and infected tissues and attract lymphocytes Cytokines released by cells to signal action by other cells The Human Immune System
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lymphoid tissue-thymus, bone marrow, spleeen, and lymph nodes lymph nodes are sites for immune cells to communicate, regulating immune responses Cells of the Immune System
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Summary Our immune system protects us from disease. The cells are derived from our bone marrow, and include innate (always existing) and adaptive (must be activated) immunity. Lymph nodes are sites where the immune cells exchange information to stimulate adaptive immunity. The entire system includes the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and the lymphatic system of ducts and nodes, and is about equal to the size of your liver or brain Study Guide
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Define innate immunity. List different examples of innate immunity. Innate immunity- general protection
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIO 181R taught by Professor Browser during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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BIO 181R notes H and G, Defense Against Disease - Immune...

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