A18-Critical Essay.doc - Revelation A18 CRITICAL ESSAY Your main assignment for this section is to write a short critical essay based on one of the

A18-Critical Essay.doc - Revelation A18 CRITICAL ESSAY Your...

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Revelation A18 CRITICAL ESSAY Your main assignment for this section is to write a short critical essay based on one of the poems you've read for this module or another poem you've encountered elsewhere. Whatever poem you choose, be sure that it's substantial enough to bear a critical analysis. In other words, don't select a poem that's light, frivolous, and intended merely to amuse or entertain. Note: If you use a poem not included in this module, be sure to attach a photocopy. In preparing to write your essay, follow these steps: Go through the poems, think about the ones that speak to you the most, and select one that you'd like to write about. Work again through first-, second-, and third-level responses to the poem in order to decide for yourself just what it is you want to say. Formulate a thesis statement. Try to move beyond a basic observation in order to formulate a thesis that you can argue by citing aspects of the poem you're considering. Organize your ideas; try for at least three points in defence of your thesis, and present each in a separate paragraph. Draft your essay with an effective introduction, body, and conclusion. Revise your work until you're satisfied with it. Edit your revised work and produce a final, polished copy. Don't forget to proofread. Poem of choice: Ozymandias I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said— “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert .... Near them, on the sand, Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal, these words appear: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
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Revelation A18 Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.” Individuals have a tendency to assume that the more have an impact in their lives, the more untouchable and unforgettable they are. In reality absolutely everyone is forgettable irrespective on what you own, in the future everybody will seize to exist, and could flow into the inevitable. In the poem Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Shelley proposes the idea of oblivion of character and all of their work/contributions as being inevitable, this which means that in the end in spite of how effective or wealthy one might have been they in the end seize to exist and all ties associated to them disappear. In the first three lines of the poem it states what the traveller has witnessed in his ride to the dessert. The poet paints the photograph of a broken-down statue and the expression sculpted onto the stone which created the atmosphere of separation and coldness around the king. Shelly tells the story of the shattered statue from the angle of another character which permits her to feature another degree of obscurity to Ozymandias’s role with reference to the reader. Furthermore, the ancient king is considered even less
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