LongTermMemory.pdf - Long-term Memory September 24th 2020...

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September 24th, 2020Long-term Memory© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Some Questions to ConsiderHow does damage to the brain affect the ability to remember what has happened in the past and the ability to form new memories of ongoing experiences?How are memories for personal experiences, like what you did last summer, different from memories for facts, like the capital of your state?How do the different types of memory interact in our everyday experience?How has memory loss been depicted in popular films?
© L. Grant Canipe3The Man with No Past On the 4th of December 2005, David Fitzpatrick was a normal 25-year-old with family, friends and memories. That afternoon David suffered on of the rarest forms of memory loss ever recorded. The Psychogenic Fugue wiped his memory clean, leaving him with no identity. This films follows David as he tries to find the life he had before.
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Long-Term Memory“Archive” of information about past events and knowledge learnedWorks closely with working memoryStorage stretches from a few moments ago to as far back as one can rememberMore recent memories are more detailedFigure 6.1 Long-term memory covers a span that stretches from about 30 seconds ago to your earliest memories. Thus, all of this student’s memories, except the memory “I just sat down” and anything the student was rehearsing, would be classified as long-term memories.
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Serial PositionMurdoch (1962)Distinction between short-term and long-term memories using the serial position curveRead stimulus list, write down all words rememberedFigure 6.3 Serial position curve (Murdoch, 1962). Notice that memory is better for words presented at the beginning of the list (primacy effect) and at the end (recency effect).
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Serial PositionMemory better for stimuli presented at beginningPrimacy effect gave more time to rehearse information, more likely to enter long-term memory (LTM)Figure 6.4 Results of Rundus’s (1971) experiment. The solid red line is the usual serial position curve. The dashed blue line indicates how many times the subjects rehearsed (said out loud) each word on the list. Note how the rehearsal curve matches the initial part of the serial position curve.
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Serial PositionMemory better for stimuli presented at end of listRecency effect: Stimuli still in STMFigure 6.5 Results of Glanzer and Cunitz’s (1966) experiment. The serial position curve has a normal recency effect when the memory test is immediate (solid red line), but no recency effect occurs if the memory test is delayed for 30 seconds (dashed blue line).
© L. Grant Canipe III, Ph.D.Coding in Short-Termand Long-Term MemoryVisual and auditory encoding in short- and long-term memorySemantic encoding in short- and long-term memoryWickens and coworkers (1976)Interference enhanced by meanings of words

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