2.1 (writing conventions in major)

2.1 (writing conventions in major) - Bryant 1 Justin Bryant...

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Bryant 1 Justin Bryant 12 March 2007 English 131 Q 2.1: Political Science Writing Conventions Part A After searching through the University of Washington database I elected to use The American Journal of Political Science (APSJ) to analyze writing conventions used in the political science discipline. APSJ contains research in every area of political science, including American Politics, political theory and international relations. The editorial board is composed of professors from across the nation, including Gary Segura of the University of Washington. Published on behalf of the Midwest Political Science Association, APSJ accepts and reviews manuscripts under 40 pages from any author and then selects the top articles which make an outstanding contribution to scholarly knowledge in any field of political science. Almost all contributing authors are professors at universities across the nation and many have numerous articles published in the journal. In its most recent publication, article topics ranged from market reforms in Latin America, African American politicians, budget changes and negativity in politics. The in depth analysis and wide range of articles make the American Journal of Political Science a great resource for analyzing the writing conventions of the political science discipline. Part B The APSJ uses the Political Science Association’s Style Manual for Political Science , which is based of The Chicago Manual of Style , to cite sources used in an article. This form of citation requires parenthetical citations within a paper to indicate the source of a quote or an idea which is not originally the authors and also requires a reference list in proper format following the essay. The following are examples of both Style Manual for Political Science and Modern Language Association citations for the same source.
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Bryant 2 A. Style Manual for Political Science citation Rudolph, Thomas J. 2003. “Who’s Responsible for the Economy? The Formation and Consequences of Responsibility Attributions.” American Journal of Political Science 47(4):698–713. B. Modern Language Association citation
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2.1 (writing conventions in major) - Bryant 1 Justin Bryant...

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