study guide for poli sci 417 test 1

Study guide for - 1 Political Science 417 Midterm Review Sheet National Election Studies Electoral College(how it works why we have it-Each state

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1 Political Science 417 Midterm Review Sheet National Election Studies Electoral College (how it works, why we have it) -Each state has 2 electors (senate seats) and the equivalent of however many districts the state has. -When the final votes have been turned in, the electors go to the state capital with a final ballot. Then travel to DC where the VP reads the ballots in the senate and declares the new president. -If no majority has been reached the congress will choose the president and the senate will choose the VP. Battleground state (purple state) -Candidates approach the election in the context of the electoral college and what they need to do to win the most votes. Most focus placed on battle ground states. LBJ, Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Southern politics Secular realignment Secular Realignment : more gradual change in party affiliation in a particular area. i.e. the shift in NE from Republican to almost entirely Democratic Critical election/realignment Critical Election: 2.Most elections are NOT realigning. Critical elections have occurred in 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, and 1932. 3.Realignments happen regularly; approx. every 30 years. 4.There is a mechanism that causes these realignments; a tension, or stress, causes this to happen. 5.High voter concern and turnout. 6.New dominant voter cleavage. 7.Ideological politics; left vs. right, no room for moderates. 8.Critical elections hinge on national issues. 9.Result in major government policy change. Realignment: -Drastic, quick changes in the partisan attachments of people in a specific area. (Electoral realignment). -Observed after a “critical election.” Vladimir Orlando Key. 3rd-party candidates -Unable to raise funds. -Visibility. -Voter loyalties. -Single issue parties. Best performances by 3 rd party candidates: -George Wallace ’68: ran segregationist platform. 13% of vote. -1980: John Anderson. 6% of vote. -1992: Ross Perot 19%. -1996: Ross Perot 8%. -2000: Ralph Nader: 3% Strategic voting Methods of convention delegate selection (convention, caucus, primary)
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Selecting Delegates 10.Party convention 11.Caucus: local meeting à county convention à congressional district à state convention à national convention; caucuses also often take straw polls (an unofficial vote), used to facilitate the media, give them some sense of what happened in the caucus, as they can be very complicated and difficult to cover. 12.Primary: a simple vote. Takes place across the state, the same day. Votes are for presidential nominees. Whoever wins the most in either party, their delegates attend the national convention. Republicans: whoever wins, all the nominees are their supporters; Democrats: more proportional, if a nominee gets 50%, roughly 50% of the delegates will be their supporters.
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course POLISCI 417 taught by Professor ? during the Fall '08 term at Washington State University .

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Study guide for - 1 Political Science 417 Midterm Review Sheet National Election Studies Electoral College(how it works why we have it-Each state

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