Leohr Sargent - 1-8 Analytical Reading Student.pdf - ANALYTICAL READING ACTIVITIES TOPIC 1.8 AP United States Government and Politics About the College

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AP United States Government and PoliticsANALYTICAL READING ACTIVITIES TOPIC 1.8
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© 2019 The College Board. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. AP Capstone is a trademark owned by the College Board. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Visit the College Board on the Web: About the College BoardThe College Board is a mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the College Board was created to expand access to higher education. Today, the membership association is made up of over 6,000 of the world’s leading educational institutions and is dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education. Each year, the College Board helps more than seven million students prepare for a successful transition to college through programs and services in college readiness and college success—including the SAT®and the Advanced Placement Program®. The organization also serves the education community through research and advocacy on behalf of students, educators, and schools.For further information, visit .AcknowledgementsAP Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment TeamErin Spaulding,Senior Director, AP Curriculum, Instruction, and AssessmentAmy Smallwood-Ringenberg,Director, AP Instructional DesignAP U.S. Government and Politics Instructional Design TeamAlicia Ross, Blue Ridge High School, New Milford, PAMichael Dies,YES Prep Southeast, Houston, TXMatt Furfaro,Concord Community High School, Elkhart, INOther ContributorsJohn R. WilliamsonChristopher Budano
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Analytical Reading ActivitiesAP U.S. Government and Politics3Topic 1.8: Constitutional Interpretations of FederalismSource AnalysisBefore You ReadTo prepare for reading two arguments about the Tenth Amendment, list what you know about powers that the states have and some that the federal government has. List your thoughts in the chart below. Then, respond to the questions that follow the chart. Powers that States HavePowers that the Federal Government Has Powers that both States and the Federal Government HaveWhy do you think the founders gave some powers to the states and some powers to the federal government?Why would some people want to limit the powers given to the federal government?Required Document: The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United StatesPaired with: Matters of Debate essays from the National Constitution Center Related Concepts:FederalismBill of RightsFederalist and Antifederalists Necessary and Proper ClauseEnumerated PowersImplied PowersComparisonExplain the reasons for similarities and differencesSource AnalysisExplain how the author’s argument or perspective relates to political principles, institutions, processes, policies, and behaviors.
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Analytical Reading ActivitiesAP U.S. Government and Politics4The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
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