quiz week 3.docx - Question 1 4 4 pts The American...

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Question 1 4 / 4 ptsThe American Revolution resulted directly from the failure of the British government to clearly define the role that they intended their North American colonies and colonists to play. The colonies developed quickly, while the king and Parliament were distracted by colonies and conflicts in other parts of the world. By the time they were able to focus more specifically on their colonies here in North America, the colonists who lived here already felt as if they had defined their own role and carved out their own way of life. One of the first and biggest problems were British attempts to change things after the French andIndian War (Europeans call it the Seven Years’ War). It was truly a world war, fought between multiple empires on multiple continents. At its conclusion, the British Empire had never been larger. Britain now controlled the North American continent east of the Mississippi River, including French Canada. It had also consolidated its control over India. But the realities and responsibilities of the postwar empire were daunting. War (let alone victory) on such a scale was costly. Britain doubled its national debt to 13.5 times its annual revenue. Britain faced significantnew costs required to secure and defend its colonies all over the world, especially the western frontiers of the North American colonies. These factors led Britain in the 1760s to attempt to consolidate control over its North American colonies, which, in turn, led to resistance.King George III took the crown in 1760 and took on an authoritarian attitude, which treated the colonies and colonists like children who needed to be obedient and closely supervised. The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was Britain’s first major action targeting North America after the French and Indian War had ended, and it became a major source of dissatisfaction among American colonists that helped lead to the Revolutionary War. In his Proclamation, the king forbade colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains in an attempt to limit costly wars with Native Americans. Colonists, however, protested and demanded access to the territory for which they had fought alongside the British in the war.In the following years, Parliament passed more reforms. The Sugar Act sought to combat widespread smuggling of molasses in New England by cutting the tax in half but increasing enforcement. The Currency Act restricted colonies from producing paper money, which was hardon colonial economies. The Stamp Act required that many documents be printed on paper that had been stamped to show the tax on that official paper had been paid, including newspapers, pamphlets, diplomas, legal documents, and even playing cards. Parliament had never before directly taxed the colonists. Plus, this tax directly affected numerous groups throughout colonial society, including printers, lawyers, college graduates, and even sailors who played cards. This led, in part, to broader, more popular resistance. Riots broke out in Boston. Colonists and the

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