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precis 2-20-08 - Prcis The passage from Meridel Le...

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Précis 2-20-08 The passage from Meridel Le Sueur’s “Women on the Breadlines” (1932) displays how The Great Depression affected an endless number of people of any race, gender or religion. In this particular passage, Sueur describes a typical day of an unemployed woman in Minneapolis. She waits everyday at the free employment bureau, praying and hoping a job will become available. She talks about how the same people are there every day; ashamed of being on a “breadline” they do not talk or look at each other. They gaze at floor tiles so they do not have to look or talk to one another. She claims that only the young and beautiful women find jobs, while the older middle-aged women wait and starve; women unlike men do not sleep on park benches, steal or kill for food. This article is significant because it showed the challenges that women, in particular poor middle-aged women faced, and how hard they struggled to survive during The Great Depression.
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