precis 3-28-08

precis 3-28-08 - Prcis 3-28-08 The Supreme Court's decision...

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Précis 3-28-08 The Supreme Court’s decision on Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954) served as a turning point and as a milestone in the start of the civil rights movement. It reviewed the “separate but equal” principle decided by the case of Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 and the fourteenth amendment. The Court contrary to the 1896 decision ruled that the schools were not equal; the Court also ruled the concept of segregation based on race was unconstitutional. African Americans sought the aid of the courts to obtain admission into public schools of their community regardless of race. Chief Justice Warren discussed how the plaintiffs (African Americans) argued that the schools were not equal, and could not be made equal therefore; they were being deprived of the equal protection of laws such as the fourteenth amendment. The Chief Justice also points out the case of Plessy v. Ferguson dealt with public transportation not public education. He placed current society
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precis 3-28-08 - Prcis 3-28-08 The Supreme Court's decision...

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